Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTanner, Edmund VJ
dc.contributor.authorBellingham, Peter J
dc.contributor.authorHealey, John R
dc.contributor.authorFeeley, Kenneth J
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-07T08:10:21Z
dc.date.available2022-06-07T08:10:21Z
dc.date.issued2022-09
dc.identifier.issn0906-7590
dc.identifier.otherecog12900
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/337734
dc.description.abstractThermophilization – changes in community composition towards greater relative abundances of species associated with warmer environments – has been described for plants and animals in many locations around the world. Disturbances of various kinds have increased rates of thermophilization in temperate sites, and this has been proposed, but not demonstrated, for some tropical environments. In this study, we tested whether disturbance by a category 4 hurricane in 1988 (Hurricane Gilbert) increased thermophilization in a Jamaican montane forest by using pre‐ and post‐hurricane data collected over four decades (1974–2014). We analysed tree species composition in permanent plots at ca 1580 m above sea level in Jamaica's Blue Mountains. There were 66 tree species with stem diameters ≥ 3 cm at breast height. We used published data on the altitudinal distribution of 62 species (94% of genetic individuals (genets)) to calculate the mean community altitude scores (MCAS) of the trees recorded in each census, as well as the MCAS of the survivors, recruits and dead trees after each decade. We found that thermophilization did occur (i.e. MCAS decreased significantly over time), and that this was due both to a decreasing MCAS of recruits through the four decades (significantly lower than expected in the last three decades) as well as a high MCAS of trees that died. Thermophilization was fastest in the post‐hurricane decade, during which time there was marked and significant increase in the MCAS of dead trees; this change was above and beyond expectations of long‐term successional dynamics. The rate of compositional change equates to an overall decrease in MCAS of 1.6 m yr−1 over the forty‐year study period. We conclude that this Jamaican montane forest is undergoing thermophilization (likely due to rising temperature) and that the hurricane‐caused disturbance accelerated thermophilization through differential mortality.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectResearch
dc.subjectaltitude
dc.subjectclimate change
dc.subjectcyclone
dc.subjectforest inventory plots
dc.subjectglobal warming
dc.subjectmortality
dc.subjectrecruitment
dc.subjectspecies migration
dc.subjecttrees
dc.subjecttropical
dc.titleHurricane disturbance accelerated the thermophilization of a Jamaican montane forest
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-06-07T08:10:21Z
prism.publicationNameEcography
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.85143
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-04-27
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/ecog.06100
rioxxterms.versionAO
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.contributor.orcidTanner, Edmund VJ [0000-0002-4961-9993]
dc.identifier.eissn1600-0587
cam.issuedOnline2022-05-30


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record