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dc.contributor.authorMendham, Amy E
dc.contributor.authorGoedecke, Julia H
dc.contributor.authorKufe, Nyuyki Clement
dc.contributor.authorSoboyisi, Melikhaya
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Antonia
dc.contributor.authorWestgate, Kate
dc.contributor.authorBrage, Soren
dc.contributor.authorMicklesfield, Lisa K
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-27T23:30:41Z
dc.date.available2022-06-27T23:30:41Z
dc.date.issued2022-08-01
dc.identifier.issn1543-3080
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/338379
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: We first explored the associations between physical behaviors and total and regional adiposity. Second, we examined how reallocating time in different physical behaviors was associated with total body fat mass in men and women from a low-income South African setting. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included a sample of 692 participants (384 men and 308 women) aged 41-72 years. Physical behaviors were measured using integrated hip and thigh accelerometry to estimate total movement volume and time spent in sleeping, sitting/lying, standing, light physical activity, and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Total body fat mass and regional adiposity were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. RESULTS: The associations between total movement volume and measures of regional obesity were mediated by total body adiposity. In men, reallocating 30 minutes of sitting/lying to 30 minutes of MVPA was associated with 1.0% lower fat mass. In women, reallocation of 30 minutes of sitting/lying to MVPA and 30 minutes of standing to MVPA were associated with a 0.3% and 1.4% lower fat mass, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Although the association between physical behaviors and fat mass differed between men and women, the overall public health message is similar; reallocating sedentary time to MVPA is associated with a reduction in fat mass in both men and women.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe study was funded by the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) with funds received from the South African National Department of Health, the UKMRC (via the Newton Fund), and GSK Africa Non-Communicable Disease Open Lab (via a supporting Grant project no: ES/N013891/1). SB, KWe and AS were supported by the UK Medical Research Council (MC_UU_12015/3) and the NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre (IS-BRC-1215-20014). Supplementary funds were also received from the South African National Research Foundation (NRF; Grant no: UID:98561).
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved
dc.rights.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
dc.titlePhysical Behaviors and Their Association With Adiposity in Men and Women From a Low-Resourced African Setting.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-06-24T14:09:15Z
prism.publicationNameJ Phys Act Health
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.85791
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-06-22
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1123/jpah.2022-0032
rioxxterms.versionAM
dc.contributor.orcidWestgate, Kate [0000-0002-0283-3562]
dc.identifier.eissn1543-5474
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idCambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH) (146281)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_00006/4)
cam.issuedOnline2022-07-19
cam.orpheus.successWed Aug 03 09:45:55 BST 2022 - Embargo updated
cam.orpheus.counter2
cam.depositDate2022-06-24
pubs.licence-identifierapollo-deposit-licence-2-1
pubs.licence-display-nameApollo Repository Deposit Licence Agreement
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2022-07-19


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