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dc.contributor.authorMattila, Anniina LK
dc.contributor.authorJiggins, Chris D
dc.contributor.authorSaastamoinen, Marjo
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-29T19:45:24Z
dc.date.available2022-06-29T19:45:24Z
dc.date.issued2022-07
dc.date.submitted2022-01-07
dc.identifier.issn2045-7758
dc.identifier.otherece39041
dc.identifier.otherece-2022-01-00022.r1
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/338503
dc.description.abstractAposematic animals advertise their toxicity or unpalatability with bright warning coloration. However, acquiring and maintaining chemical defenses can be energetically costly, and consequent associations with other important traits could shape chemical defense evolution. Here, we have tested whether chemical defenses are involved in energetic trade-offs with other traits, or whether the levels of chemical defenses are condition dependent, by studying associations between biosynthesized cyanogenic toxicity and a suite of key life-history and fitness traits in a Heliconius butterfly under a controlled laboratory setting. Heliconius butterflies are well known for the diversity of their warning color patterns and widespread mimicry and can both sequester the cyanogenic glucosides of their Passiflora host plants and biosynthesize these toxins de novo. We find energetically costly life-history traits to be either unassociated or to show a general positive association with biosynthesized cyanogenic toxicity. More toxic individuals developed faster and had higher mass as adults and a tendency for increased lifespan and fecundity. These results thus indicate that toxicity level of adult butterflies may be dependent on individual condition, influenced by genetic background or earlier conditions, with maternal effects as one strong candidate mechanism. Additionally, toxicity was higher in older individuals, consistent with previous studies indicating accumulation of toxins with age. As toxicity level at death was independent of lifespan, cyanogenic glucoside compounds may have been recycled to release resources relevant for longevity in these long-living butterflies. Understanding the origins and maintenance of variation in defenses is necessary in building a more complete picture of factors shaping the evolution of aposematic and mimetic systems.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectChemical ecology
dc.subjectEntomology
dc.subjectEvolutionary ecology
dc.subjectLife history ecology
dc.subjectZoology
dc.subjectRESEARCH ARTICLE
dc.subjectRESEARCH ARTICLES
dc.subjectaposematism
dc.subjectchemical defenses
dc.subjectcondition dependence
dc.subjectcyanogenic glucosides
dc.subjectHeliconius
dc.subjectmimicry
dc.subjecttrade‐offs
dc.titleCondition dependence in biosynthesized chemical defenses of an aposematic and mimetic Heliconius butterfly.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-06-29T19:45:24Z
prism.issueIdentifier6
prism.publicationNameEcol Evol
prism.volume12
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.85916
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-05-27
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1002/ece3.9041
rioxxterms.versionAO
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidMattila, Anniina LK [0000-0002-6546-6528]
dc.contributor.orcidJiggins, Chris D [0000-0002-7809-062X]
dc.contributor.orcidSaastamoinen, Marjo [0000-0001-7009-2527]
dc.identifier.eissn2045-7758
pubs.funder-project-idAcademy of Finland (286814)
cam.issuedOnline2022-06-24


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