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dc.contributor.authorMassmann, Alexander
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-01T08:42:15Z
dc.date.available2022-07-01T08:42:15Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.issn0384-9694
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/338650
dc.descriptionIn De ciuitate Dei (ciu.), Augustine calls people with disabilities purposefully created by an absolutely competent God (16.8). On the whole, however, Augustine’s views on disabilities in ciu. are commonly misunderstood. Disabilities raise the theodicy question for him, and the goodness of people with disabilities, hidden to experience, must be accepted on faith. This stance results from Augustine’s view that dignity emerges from the beauty, rationality, and utility of the ensouled body. For Augustine, “deformity defeats beauty” (19.4), reducing dignity along with beauty and embodied rationality. In eternal salvation, however, disabilities will be removed. If martyrs retain scars in heaven, “there will not be deformitas in them, but dignitas” (22.19). However, for what reason did God create disabilities in the first place? Augustine regards disabilities as temporal embodied warnings of eternal corporeal punishment (21.8). As a concluding perspective, the alternative view of disabilities by the Apostle Paul will be considered.
dc.description.abstractIn De ciuitate Dei (ciu.), Augustine calls people with disabilities purposefully created by an absolutely competent God (16.8). On the whole, however, Augustine’s views on disabilities in ciu. are commonly misunderstood. Disabilities raise the theodicy question for him, and the goodness of people with disabilities, hidden to experience, must be accepted on faith. This stance results from Augustine’s view that dignity emerges from the beauty, rationality, and utility of the ensouled body. For Augustine, “deformity defeats beauty” (19.4), reducing dignity along with beauty and embodied rationality. In eternal salvation, however, disabilities will be removed. If martyrs retain scars in heaven, “there will not be deformitas in them, but dignitas” (22.19). However, for what reason did God create disabilities in the first place? Augustine regards disabilities as temporal embodied warnings of eternal corporeal punishment (21.8). As a concluding perspective, the alternative view of disabilities by the Apostle Paul will be considered.
dc.formatMicrosoft Word
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectDisabilities
dc.subjectAugustine
dc.subjectCity of God
dc.subjectTheodicy
dc.subjectPlinian races
dc.subjectCreation
dc.title“Those Who Cannot See the Whole Are Offended by the Apparent Deformity of a Part”: Disability in Augustine’s City of God
dc.typeArticle
dc.publisher.departmentFaculty of Divinity
dc.date.updated2022-05-29T19:43:04Z
prism.publicationNameJournal of Religious Ethics
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.84998
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-05-25
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/jore.12399
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dcterms.formatpdf
dc.identifier.eissn1467-9795
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
cam.issuedOnline2022-07-06
cam.orpheus.counter5
cam.depositDate2022-05-29
pubs.licence-identifierapollo-deposit-licence-2-1
pubs.licence-display-nameApollo Repository Deposit Licence Agreement


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