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dc.contributor.authorBlakesley, Rosalind
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-05T23:30:11Z
dc.date.available2022-07-05T23:30:11Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/338825
dc.description.abstractIn October 2021, at the conference “Gdańsk-Danzig-Gduńsk within the Baltic Borderlands” (co-organised by the Faculty of History at the University of Gdańsk and the Centre for Geopolitics at the University of Cambridge), Norman Davies declared that “Russia is a latecomer, not to say an imperial intruder” on the shores of the Baltic Sea. Just four months later, Vladimir Putin’s neoimperialist ambitions caused shockwaves around the world when Russia invaded Ukraine on 24 February 2022. The legacy of the historic colonialist aggression, the reality of its current incarnation, and the postcolonial imperative to examine the power dynamics between oppressed and hegemonic communities has understandably shifted scholarly attention away from Russia’s voice in artistic conversations around the Baltic Sea. Instead, scholars of cultural interaction in the region are prioritising the perspectives, experiences, and agency of those who lived under, rather than imposed, colonial rule. Yet the Baltic Sea played a seminal role in imperial Russia’s artistic development as much as it did her social, economic, and geopolitical life. Focusing on the mid eighteenth century, this chapter considers the Baltic region as a unique conduit for Russia’s transcultural exchange, with all the imperialist rivalry that this entailed. It takes as its case study a handful of portraits of Catherine the Great (1729-96) by two artists with roots in four Baltic states: Anna Rosina Lisiewska (also known as Rosine Liszewska and by her married names of Matthieu and de Gasc, 1716-83), a painter of noble Polish origin who had been born and schooled in a family of painters in the growing Prussian capital of Berlin; and the Dane Vigilius Eriksen (1722-82) who, failing to find favour at the Royal Danish Academy of Portraiture, Sculpture and Architecture, relocated to Russia in 1757 and became Catherine’s most inventive portraitist until his return to Copenhagen in 1772. Tracing the trajectories of their portraits enables us to resurrect a commanding nexus between political ascendency, international relations, and visual imagery, and to consider the function of paintings as highly charged conductors of power relations around the Baltic Sea.
dc.description.sponsorshipLeverhulme Trust
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved
dc.rights.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
dc.titleThe Pole, the Dane, and the Ascendent Empress: Shaping the Image of Catherine the Great around the Baltic Sea
dc.typeArticle
dc.publisher.departmentDepartment of History of Art
dc.date.updated2022-06-28T12:36:07Z
prism.publicationNameStudia Historica Gedanensia
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.86232
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-03-30
rioxxterms.versionAM
dc.contributor.orcidBlakesley, Rosalind [0000-0001-9181-9369]
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idLeverhulme Trust (MRF-2019-121)
cam.orpheus.counter11*
cam.depositDate2022-06-28
pubs.licence-identifierapollo-deposit-licence-2-1
pubs.licence-display-nameApollo Repository Deposit Licence Agreement
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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