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Total and temporal patterning of physical activity in adolescents and associations with mental wellbeing.

Published version
Peer-reviewed

Repository DOI


Change log

Authors

Alshallal, Abdulwahab D 
Alliott, Olivia 
Brage, Soren 
van Sluijs, Esther MF 
Wilkinson, Paul 

Abstract

BACKGROUND: There is limited understanding of the extent to which differences in physical activity across the day and week may be associated with mental wellbeing. Such an understanding is needed for better targeting of interventions. In this study, we describe total and temporal patterning of physical activity across the week in adolescents (age 13-14y) and assess their prospective associations with mental wellbeing. METHODS: 1,983 13-14-year-old adolescent participants based in Cambridgeshire and Essex, recruited between 2016 and 2017 into the Get Others Active Trial provided data at baseline and 4 months. Physical activity was measured at baseline using wrist-worn accelerometers across different time segments (whole week, weekday schooltime, weekday out of school, and weekend), and operationalized as average movement-related acceleration for each time segment. Mental Wellbeing at baseline and 4 months was measured using the Warwick Edinburgh MentalWellbeing Scale. Associations between physical activity across different time segments (whole week, weekday schooltime, weekday out of school, and weekend) and mental wellbeing at 4 months were investigated using sex-stratified multi-level regression models, adjusted for covariates, and both adjusted and unadjusted for baseline mental wellbeing. RESULTS: Our analyses found positive associations between physical activity and mental wellbeing at 4 months, unadjusted for baseline wellbeing. Among girls, positive associations were shown when considering physical activity across the whole week 0.07 (95% CI, 0.03-0.12), and across all separate time periods studied: weekday schooltime 0.07 (95% CI, 0.02-0.11), weekday out-of-school time 0.07 (95% CI, 0.03-0.12), and weekend 0.07 (95% CI, 0.02-0.11). For boys, similar associations were observed for activity across the week 0.07 (95% CI, 0.03-0.11), during weekday schooltime 0.08 (95% CI, 0.04-0.12), and weekday out-of-school time 0.07 (95% CI, 0.03-0.11), but not the weekend 0.01 (95% CI, -0.03-0.05). For both girls and boys, associations were attenuated below significance after adjusting for baseline wellbeing. CONCLUSIONS: This longitudinal analysis showed positive associations between physical activity and later mental wellbeing in both male and female adolescents across most time segments. Higher physical activity throughout the week may be associated with better mental wellbeing in the adolescent population. Further research is required to understand determinants of change in wellbeing over time. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Registration Number: ISRCTN31583496. Registered: 18/02/2014.

Description

Acknowledgements: The authors would like to thank all participants who contributed data to the GoActive study.

Keywords

Adolescents, Mental wellbeing, Physical activity pattern, Humans, Adolescent, Female, Male, Exercise, Movement, Schools

Journal Title

Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act

Conference Name

Journal ISSN

1479-5868
1479-5868

Volume Title

21

Publisher

Springer Science and Business Media LLC
Sponsorship
MRC (MC_UU_00006/5)
Medical Research Council (MC_UU_12015/7)
MRC (MR/T010576/1)
National Institute for Health and Care Research (IS-BRC-1215-20014)