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Fine-grained topographic organization within somatosensory cortex during resting-state and emotional face-matching task and its association with ASD traits.

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Peer-reviewed

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Authors

Isakoglou, Christina  ORCID logo  https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3803-0400
Haak, Koen V 
Wolfers, Thomas 
Floris, Dorothea L 
Llera, Alberto 

Abstract

Sensory atypicalities are particularly common in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Nevertheless, our knowledge about the divergent functioning of the underlying somatosensory region and its association with ASD phenotype features is limited. We applied a data-driven approach to map the fine-grained variations in functional connectivity of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) to the rest of the brain in 240 autistic and 164 neurotypical individuals from the EU-AIMS LEAP dataset, aged between 7 and 30. We estimated the S1 connection topography ('connectopy') at rest and during the emotional face-matching (Hariri) task, an established measure of emotion reactivity, and accessed its association with a set of clinical and behavioral variables. We first demonstrated that the S1 connectopy is organized along a dorsoventral axis, mapping onto the S1 somatotopic organization. We then found that its spatial characteristics were linked to the individuals' adaptive functioning skills, as measured by the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, across the whole sample. Higher functional differentiation characterized the S1 connectopies of individuals with higher daily life adaptive skills. Notably, we detected significant differences between rest and the Hariri task in the S1 connectopies, as well as their projection maps onto the rest of the brain suggesting a task-modulating effect on S1 due to emotion processing. All in all, variation of adaptive skills appears to be reflected in the brain's mesoscale neural circuitry, as shown by the S1 connectivity profile, which is also differentially modulated during rest and emotional processing.

Description

Acknowledgements: This work is primarily supported by the EU-AIMS consortium (European Autism Interventions), which receives support from Innovative Medicines Initiative Joint Undertaking Grant No.115300, the resources of which are composed of financial contributions from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (Grant No. FP7/2007–2013), from the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations companies’ in-kind contributions; and by the AIMS-2-TRIALS consortium (Autism Innovative Medicine Studies-2-Trials), which has received funding from the Innovative Medicines Initiative 2 Joint Undertaking under grant agreement No. 777394, and this Joint Undertaking receives support from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme and EFPIA and AUTISM SPEAKS, Autistica, SFARI. This work reflects the authors’ views and neither IMI nor the European Union, EFPIA or any Associated Partners are responsible for any use that may be made of the information contained therein. CI is supported by funding from the Gravitation Programme ‘Language in Interaction’ Grant No. 024.001.006 from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research. KVH gratefully acknowledges funding from the Dutch Research Council (Veni 016.171.068 and Vidi 09150171910043). TW gratefully acknowledges the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No 895011. DLF is supported by funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No 101025785. AL was supported by CANDY (Grant No. 847818). JKB was supported by the Horizon 2020 supported programme CANDY (Grant No. 847818). AFM gratefully acknowledges support from the Netherlands Institute for Scientific research under a VIDI grant (016.156.415) and an ERC consolidator grant (10100118). CFB gratefully acknowledges funding from the Wellcome Trust Collaborative Award in Science 215573/Z/19/Z and the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research Vici Grant No. 17854 and NWO-CAS Grant No. 012-200-013.


Funder: Gravitation Programme ‘Language in Interaction’ Grant No. 024.001.006 from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research


Funder: the Dutch Research Council (Veni 016.171.068 and Vidi 09150171910043)


Funder: the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No 895011n


Funder: the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No 101025785


Funder: CANDY (Grant No. 847818)


Funder: the Horizon2020 supported programme CANDY (Grant No. 847818)


Funder: a VIDI grant (016.156.415) and an ERC consolidator grant (10100118)


Funder: the Wellcome Trust Collaborative Award in Science 215573/Z/19/Z and the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research Vici Grant No. 17854 and NWO-CAS Grant No. 012-200-013

Keywords

Humans, Somatosensory Cortex, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Brain, Emotions, Brain Mapping, Phenotype, Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Journal Title

Transl Psychiatry

Conference Name

Journal ISSN

2158-3188
2158-3188

Volume Title

13

Publisher

Springer Science and Business Media LLC