History and Turning the Antitrust Page


Type
Article
Change log
Authors
Cheffins, BR 
Abstract

jats:pPresent-day advocates of antitrust reform referred to as “New Brandeisians” have invoked history in pressing the case for change. The New Brandeisians bemoan the upending of a mid-twentieth-century “golden age” of antitrust by an intellectual movement known as the Chicago School. In fact, mid-twentieth-century enforcement of antitrust was uneven and large corporations exercised substantial market power. The Chicago School also was not as decisive an agent of change as the New Brandeisians suggest. Doubts about the efficacy of government regulation and concerns about foreign competition did much to foster the late twentieth-century counterrevolution that antitrust experienced.</jats:p>

Description
Keywords
antitrust, Chicago School, monopoly, oligopoly, foreign competition, deregulation
Journal Title
Business History Review
Conference Name
Journal ISSN
0007-6805
2044-768X
Volume Title
95
Publisher
Cambridge University Press (CUP)