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Mechanics in the nervous system: From development to disease.

Accepted version
Peer-reviewed

Type

Article

Change log

Authors

Pillai, Eva K 

Abstract

Physical forces are ubiquitous in biological processes across scales and diverse contexts. This review highlights the significance of mechanical forces in nervous system development, homeostasis, and disease. We provide an overview of mechanical signals present in the nervous system and delve into mechanotransduction mechanisms translating these mechanical cues into biochemical signals. During development, mechanical cues regulate a plethora of processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, network formation, and cortex folding. Forces then continue exerting their influence on physiological processes, such as neuronal activity, glial cell function, and the interplay between these different cell types. Notably, changes in tissue mechanics manifest in neurodegenerative diseases and brain tumors, potentially offering new diagnostic and therapeutic target opportunities. Understanding the role of cellular forces and tissue mechanics in nervous system physiology and pathology adds a new facet to neurobiology, shedding new light on many processes that remain incompletely understood.

Description

Keywords

brain mechanics, forces, glia mechanics, mechanobiology, mechanotransduction, neuronal mechanics, stiffness, Mechanotransduction, Cellular, Nervous System, Nervous System Physiological Phenomena, Homeostasis, Cell Differentiation

Journal Title

Neuron

Conference Name

Journal ISSN

0896-6273
1097-4199

Volume Title

Publisher

Elsevier BV
Sponsorship
European Research Council (772426)
ERC, DFG, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation