Effect of glass markings on drinking rate in social alcohol drinkers.


Type
Article
Change log
Authors
Troy, David M 
Attwood, Angela S 
Maynard, Olivia M 
Scott-Samuel, Nicholas E 
Hickman, Matthew 
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The main aim of these studies was to explore the influence of volume information on glassware on the time taken to consume an alcoholic beverage. METHODS: In Study 1, male and female social alcohol consumers ( n = 159) were randomised to drink 12 fl oz of either low or standard strength lager, from either a curved glass marked with yellow tape at the midpoint or an unmarked curved glass, in a between-subjects design. In Study 2, male and female social alcohol consumers ( n = 160) were randomised to drink 12 fl oz of standard strength lager from either a curved glass marked with ¼, ½ and ¾ volume points or an unmarked curved glass, in a between-subjects design. The primary outcome measure for both studies was total drinking time of an alcoholic beverage. RESULTS: In Study 1, after removing outliers, total drinking time was slower from the glass with midpoint volume marking [mean drinking times (min): 9.98 (marked) vs. 9.55 (unmarked), mean difference = 0.42, 95% CI: -0.90, 1.44]. In Study 2, after removing outliers, total drinking time was slower from the glass with multiple volume marks [mean drinking times: 10.34 (marked) vs. 9.11 (unmarked), mean difference = 1.24, 95% CI: -0.11, 2.59]. However, in both studies confidence intervals were wide and also consistent with faster consumption from marked glasses. CONCLUSION: Consumption of an alcoholic beverage may be slower when served in glasses with volume information. Replication in larger studies is warranted.

Description
Keywords
Adult, Alcohol Drinking, Beer, Cues, Female, Humans, Male, Photic Stimulation, Social Behavior, Time Factors, Young Adult
Journal Title
Eur J Public Health
Conference Name
Journal ISSN
1101-1262
1464-360X
Volume Title
27
Publisher
Oxford University Press (OUP)