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Marine siliceous ecosystem decline led to sustained anomalous Early Triassic warmth.

Published version
Peer-reviewed

Type

Article

Change log

Authors

Lau, Kimberly V 
Rauzi, Sofia 

Abstract

In the wake of rapid CO2 release tied to the emplacement of the Siberian Traps, elevated temperatures were maintained for over five million years during the end-Permian biotic crisis. This protracted recovery defies our current understanding of climate regulation via the silicate weathering feedback, and hints at a fundamentally altered carbon and silica cycle. Here, we propose that the development of widespread marine anoxia and Si-rich conditions, linked to the collapse of the biological silica factory, warming, and increased weathering, was capable of trapping Earth's system within a hyperthermal by enhancing ocean-atmosphere CO2 recycling via authigenic clay formation. While solid-Earth degassing may have acted as a trigger, subsequent biotic feedbacks likely exacerbated and prolonged the environmental crisis. This refined view of the carbon-silica cycle highlights that the ecological success of siliceous organisms exerts a potentially significant influence on Earth's climate regime.

Description

Keywords

Carbon, Carbon Cycle, Carbon Dioxide, Ecosystem, Silicon Dioxide

Journal Title

Nat Commun

Conference Name

Journal ISSN

2041-1723
2041-1723

Volume Title

13

Publisher

Springer Science and Business Media LLC
Sponsorship
Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust (Royal Marsden) (MFP-UOW2010)