"This trainee makes me feel angry:" It's time to validate the reality and role of trainer emotions.


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Article
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Abstract

It is widely accepted that being a doctor involves a range of skills and modalities beyond the purely rational, including the emotional[1]. Even in the diagnostic process itself, clinician gut feelings (‘an uneasy feeling about a possible adverse outcome even though specific indications are lacking’[2]) have proven valuable[3]. Gingerich et al.'s[4] work on supervisors’ reactions to failing trainees sends a clear message that recognising a failing trainee also has a strong emotional component. While burdensome, these affective reactions may provide an important signal. Much has been written about the emotional burden of caring for patients[5] and, more recently, the emotional welfare of those learning medicine[7]. The unique focus of this paper, the emotional burden of training learners, resonated with our context: in the UK around 50% of clinical supervisors say their work is highly emotionally exhausting[8].

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Journal Title
Med Educ
Conference Name
Journal ISSN
0308-0110
1365-2923
Volume Title
Publisher
Wiley