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Treatment rates for the pox in early modern England: a comparative estimate of the prevalence of syphilis in the city of Chester and its rural vicinity in the 1770s

Accepted version
Peer-reviewed

Type

Article

Change log

Authors

Szreter, Simon 

Abstract

jats:titleABSTRACT</jats:title>jats:pThis article offers an innovative attempt to construct an empirically-based estimate of the extent of syphilis prevailing in two contrasting populations in late eighteenth-century Britain. Thanks to the co-incident survival of both a detailed admissions register for Chester Infirmary and a pioneering census of the city of Chester in 1774 taken by Dr John Haygarth, it is possible to produce age-specific estimates of the extent to which adults of each sex had been treated for the pox by age 35. These estimates can be produced both for the resident population of Chester city and comparatively for the rural region immediately surrounding Chester. These are the first estimates of the prevalence of this important disease produced for the eighteenth century and they can be compared with similar figures for England and Wales c. 1911–1912.</jats:p>

Description

Keywords

44 Human Society, 4303 Historical Studies, 43 History, Heritage and Archaeology, 4403 Demography

Journal Title

CONTINUITY AND CHANGE

Conference Name

Journal ISSN

0268-4160
1469-218X

Volume Title

32

Publisher

Cambridge University Press (CUP)
Sponsorship
The research for this article was completed as part of the Wellcome Strategic Award to Cambridge University, ‘Generation to Reproduction’ Award Number 088708.