Further Adventures on the Journey to the West. Master of Silent Whistle Studio


Type
Article
Change log
Authors
Ganany, Noga 
Abstract

Li and Hegel’s new translation of Xiyoubu makes a great contribution to the field of Chinese Studies not only for its masterful English translation of this seventeenth-century literary gem and its erudite introduction, but also for presenting the work with the various paratexts that accompanied its late-Ming edition. Qiancheng Li’s enlightening “Introduction” is followed by the (translated) preface, sixteen illustrations, and “Questions and Answers” essay that accompanied the main narrative in its 1641 edition. While Li and Hegel based their translation on the 1641 edition of The Further Adventures on the Journey to the West (thereafter Further Adventures), they also incorporated into Further Adventures two sets of commentaries from the 1641 and 1853 editions. By including these paratextual materials, Further Adventures intends to “reproduce as nearly as possible what readers encountered when they first read its Ming and Qing period imprints” (p. xxxv). This laudable decision renders Further Adventures a valuable resource for students and scholars of premodern Chinese literature, as it reflects publishing conventions and reading habits during the Ming and Qing dynasties, opening a window onto late-imperial book culture. Further Adventures also provides a bibliography and a useful overview of relevant scholarship and translations (including that by Shuen-fu Lin and Larry James Schulz, The Tower of Myriad Mirrors: a Supplement to Journey to the West (Ann Arbor, 2000)).

Description
Keywords
4404 Development Studies, 44 Human Society
Journal Title
BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF ORIENTAL AND AFRICAN STUDIES-UNIVERSITY OF LONDON
Conference Name
Journal ISSN
0041-977X
1474-0699
Volume Title
84
Publisher
Cambridge University Press (CUP)