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The Mystery of “Collaboration” in Henry James

Published version
Peer-reviewed

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Authors

Lello, James 

Abstract

jats:pThis article argues for the importance of collaboration as a species of literary relation in Henry James’s work. Collaboration was increasingly popular towards the end of the nineteenth century, and yet, James’s interest in and occasional practice of this compositional mode has been largely overlooked. This is partly due to James’s own ambivalent and contested relationship with multiple authorship, most obviously in his contribution to The Whole Family. However, James’s frequent identification of collaboration as a “mystery” indicates the extent to which it exerted a considerable influence over his imagination and thinking, and its association with some of his most formative moments of novelistic and vocational self-awareness. “Collaboration” is also a literary subject in its own right, most obviously in James’s 1892 story of that name, and the depiction of the practice as a unifying, if occasionally divisive, ideal offers a complex and often enigmatic vision of sociable reciprocity.</jats:p>

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Keywords

47 Language, Communication and Culture, 4705 Literary Studies

Journal Title

Humanities

Conference Name

Journal ISSN

2076-0787
2076-0787

Volume Title

10

Publisher

MDPI AG