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Evaluation of variation in special educational needs provision and its impact on health and education using administrative records for England: umbrella protocol for a mixed-methods research programme.

Published version
Peer-reviewed

Repository DOI


Change log

Authors

Lewis, Kate 
Nguyen, Vincent 
Matthews, Jacob 
Winterburn, Isaac 

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: One-third of children in England have special educational needs (SEN) provision recorded during their school career. The proportion of children with SEN provision varies between schools and demographic groups, which may reflect variation in need, inequitable provision and/or systemic factors. There is scant evidence on whether SEN provision improves health and education outcomes. METHODS: The Health Outcomes of young People in Education (HOPE) research programme uses administrative data from the Education and Child Health Insights from Linked Data-ECHILD-which contains data from all state schools, and contacts with National Health Service hospitals in England, to explore variation in SEN provision and its impact on health and education outcomes. This umbrella protocol sets out analyses across four work packages (WP). WP1 defined a range of 'health phenotypes', that is health conditions expected to need SEN provision in primary school. Next, we describe health and education outcomes (WP1) and individual, school-level and area-level factors affecting variation in SEN provision across different phenotypes (WP2). WP3 assesses the impact of SEN provision on health and education outcomes for specific health phenotypes using a range of causal inference methods to account for confounding factors and possible selection bias. In WP4 we review local policies and synthesise findings from surveys, interviews and focus groups of service users and providers to understand factors associated with variation in and experiences of identification, assessment and provision for SEN. Triangulation of findings on outcomes, variation and impact of SEN provision for different health phenotypes in ECHILD, with experiences of SEN provision will inform interpretation of findings for policy, practice and families and methods for future evaluation. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Research ethics committees have approved the use of the ECHILD database and, separately, the survey, interviews and focus groups of young people, parents and service providers. These stakeholders will contribute to the design, interpretation and communication of findings.

Description

Peer reviewed: True


Acknowledgements: We would like to acknowledge the contribution of members of the HOPE study steering committee. We gratefully acknowledge all children and families whose deidentified data are used in this research. We are grateful to the Office for National Statistics (ONS) for providing the trusted research environment for the ECHILD Database. ONS agrees that the figures and descriptions of results in the attached document may be published. This does not imply ONS' acceptance of the validity of the methods used to obtain these figures, or of any analysis of the results. The ECHILD Database uses data from the Department for We would like to acknowledge the contribution of members of the HOPE study steering committee. We gratefully acknowledge all children and families whose de-identified data are used in this research.We are grateful to the Office for National Statistics (ONS) for providing the trusted research environment for the ECHILD Database. ONS agrees that the figures and descriptions of results in the attached document may be published. This does not imply ONS' acceptance of the validity of the methods used to obtain these figures, or of any analysis of the results.The ECHILD Database uses data from the Department for Education (DfE). The DfE does not accept responsibility for any inferences or conclusions derived by the authors. This work also uses data provided by patients and collected by the National Health Service as part of their care and support. Source data can also be accessed by researchers by applying to NHS England. This work was produced using statistical data accessed via the ONS Secure Research Service. The use of this data in this work does not imply the endorsement of the ONS in relation to the interpretation or analysis of the statistical data. This work uses research datasets which may not exactly reproduce National Statistics aggregates. The views in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of UCL.

Keywords

epidemiology, health equity, health informatics, public health, qualitative research, statistics & research methods, Humans, Adolescent, State Medicine, Schools, Parents, Educational Status, Communication, Review Literature as Topic

Journal Title

BMJ Open

Conference Name

Journal ISSN

2044-6055
2044-6055

Volume Title

13

Publisher

BMJ
Sponsorship
National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) (NIHR202025)