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Hellenism, philhellenism and classical reception: commemorating the 1821 revolution

Accepted version
Peer-reviewed

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Type

Article

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Authors

Wallace, Jennifer 
Lambropoulos, Vassilis 

Abstract

jats:titleAbstract</jats:title>jats:pThe Greek Revolution of 1821–1829 mobilized the ideas of classical reception and Philhellenism developed over the previous century to appeal for international support for the war. These complicated ideas influenced the ways both Greeks and non-Greeks thought about the nation, its political character, language, literature, history, culture and landscape. How the revolution and post-revolutionary Greece have been interpreted has shifted over the past 40 years, reflecting changes in both critical theory and also in the geopolitical circumstances in the Eastern Mediterranean and globally. The bicentenary celebrations of 2021 have highlighted the complex, competing claims for the authority to give the dominant account of the founding of modern Greece. Reviewing the scholarship on both Western and Greek Hellenism over the past four decades, our article considers the relationship between classical reception, revolution and the act of commemoration and reveals the hybridity of Hellas in 1821 and 2021.</jats:p>

Description

Keywords

Hellenism, Philhellenism, Classical reception, Revolution, Greek War of Independence, nationalism, bicentennary, commemoration

Journal Title

Classical Receptions Journal

Conference Name

Journal ISSN

1759-5134
1759-5142

Volume Title

13

Publisher

Oxford University Press (OUP)

Rights

All rights reserved