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Assessing the protective role of allergic disease in gastrointestinal tract cancers using Mendelian randomization analysis.

Accepted version
Peer-reviewed

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Type

Article

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Authors

Vithayathil, Mathew 
Kar, Siddhartha 
Carter, Paul 
Mason, Amy M 

Abstract

The biological connection between allergies and cancers has been studied for several decades. Immune hypersensitivity featured among allergic individuals has been proposed to enhance immune surveillance, thereby inhibiting abnormal cell growth and thus reduce cancer risk. Similarly, the prophylaxis theory suggests that allergy symptoms may prevent cancer development by removing potential carcinogens. This hypothesis envisages a preventive role specifically for cancers of tissues that interface with the external environment, such as gastrointestinal tract cancers. A reduced risk of gastrointestinal tract cancer among individuals with self-reported allergic conditions has been observed in several but not all observational studies. However, whether the associations are causal remains unclear as observational studies are prone to residual confounding. Therefore, we conducted a Mendelian randomization study to determine the causal role of genetic liability to allergic disease in esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers.

Description

Keywords

Gastrointestinal Neoplasms, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Hypersensitivity, Mendelian Randomization Analysis, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide

Journal Title

Allergy

Conference Name

Journal ISSN

0105-4538
1398-9995

Volume Title

76

Publisher

Wiley

Rights

All rights reserved
Sponsorship
Wellcome Trust (204623/Z/16/Z)
European Commission and European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA) FP7 Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) (116074)
Medical Research Council (MC_UU_00002/7)