Care and Resistance


Type
Article
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Authors
Abstract

In their stereotypical forms, love-marriages are self-arranged and often take place across caste or community boundaries. Arranged marriages are parentally arranged and usually conform firmly to notions of caste endogamy, except in instances of love-cum-arranged marriage where the parents may agree to publicly endorse the love-choice of their child. “Forced marriages” are those in which one or the other parties to the marriage do not give their free consent. In this paper, I consider the spectrum of care within which British South Asians arrange a child’s marriage such that what is outwardly an act of care is experienced as an act of force, be this physical violence or emotional coercion. I also examine the ways in which the child’s rejection of this arrangement is sometimes nevertheless re-framed as a form of consent. Drawing on ethnographic research with those who have experienced a “forced marriage” I examine the processes through which care is constructed and comes to be re-imagined by looking at the ways in which care articulates questions of choice, marriage, gender and sexuality.

Description
Keywords
44 Human Society, 4403 Demography
Journal Title
Anthropology and Humanism
Conference Name
Journal ISSN
1559-9167
1548-1409
Volume Title
45
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell