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Homelessness Prevention through One-To-One Coaching: The Relationship between Coaching, Class Stigma, and Self-Esteem

Accepted version
Peer-reviewed

Type

Article

Change log

Abstract

Homelessness remains a prevalent issue, and estimates of the number of people without adequate shelter in the UK suggest that the issue is growing. This research draws on literature on the cognitive impact of poverty, stigma, and self-esteem to show how confidence is improved by coaching programmes with those at risk of homelessness. The paper is based on empirical research into one such programme which offers one-to-one guidance on the interlinked issues of financial management, digital skills, and employability. The research shows that coaching helps to provide relief for participants, which in turn frees up “mental bandwidth”, allowing them to focus on issues such as managing debt and rent arrears. Confidence and self-esteem, which are often lowered by class-related stigma, are also shown to improve, and it is concluded here that this is largely due to participants becoming more closely aligned with normative neoliberal assignments of value.

Description

Keywords

Poverty, digital exclusion, coaching, neoliberalism, class

Journal Title

Housing, Theory and Society

Conference Name

Journal ISSN

1403-6096
1651-2278

Volume Title

38

Publisher

Informa UK Limited

Rights

All rights reserved
Sponsorship
This work was supported by the European Social Fund; National Lottery Community Fund.