Repository logo
 

Traversing the Urban Soundscape: Black Sonic Geographies within The Minneapolis Sound

Accepted version
Peer-reviewed

Type

Article

Change log

Abstract

This paper illuminates The Minneapolis Sound’s emergence from the urban soundscapes of late twentieth century Minneapolis. Turning to the 1960s and 1970s, I trace the genre’s geohistorical emergence to a Black diasporic community who found within marginality, the possibilities to spatialize an experimental world across the urban margins. Disclosing how this experimental world was upheld by improvisatory musical ensembles and their dynamic reaffirmations of a Black sense of place, the paper reveals how The Minneapolis Sound was insurgently pioneered as a Black sonic counter culture amidst unequivocal oppression. I then temporally propel the paper into the 1980s and 1990s and explore how the artist Prince and band The Time radically re-imagined the city’s anti-Black spatial histories towards more just ends. This elucidates how, after emerging from the spatiality of the racialised metropolis, The Minneapolis Sound provided a speculative avenue of decolonial poetics through which alternative Black futures were made imaginable.

Description

Keywords

4406 Human Geography, 44 Human Society

Journal Title

Antipode

Conference Name

Journal ISSN

0066-4812
1467-8330

Volume Title

Publisher

Wiley
Sponsorship
The research upon which my paper is based was funded by 1) Fitzwilliam College 2) The University's Geography Department and 3) The Cambridge University Geographical Society. All of these organisations are explicitly acknowledged within the paper's acknowledgements.