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dc.contributor.authorGuan, D.en
dc.contributor.authorReiner, D. M.en
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Z.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-22T15:00:31Z
dc.date.available2016-04-22T15:00:31Z
dc.date.issued2014-04-20en
dc.identifier.otherCWPE1447
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/255176
dc.description.abstractDrawing on the wider 'catching up' literature, we examine the rapid growth in Chinese spending on science and technology, which, in spite of its growing infrastructure, remains heavily reliant on foreign inputs. We examine both the economic and political drivers behind China's scientific development, making a distinction between domestic investments and international technology trade. Firms provide over two-thirds of total R&D funding, most of which has been spent on 'high-tech' sectors for export production. The fastest growing research area is in environmental sciences and energy technology. China's technology imports are shifting away from 'technologies for production', towards 'technologies for innovation', encouraged by the national development strategy on enhancing scientific research capacities. In particular, we present evidence from China's imported technology contracts. Energy is the second largest sector after manufacturing in terms of imported technology contracts.en
dc.publisherFaculty of Economics
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCambridge Working Papers in Economics
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserveden
dc.rights.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved/en
dc.subjectscience and technologyen
dc.subjectspilloversen
dc.subjectimported technology contractsen
dc.titleChina's road to a global scientific powerhouseen
dc.typeWorking Paperen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.5678


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