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dc.contributor.authorNewbery, D. M.
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-11T15:25:13Z
dc.date.available2016-08-11T15:25:13Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-06
dc.identifier.otherCWPE1638
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/257148
dc.description.abstractHeavily Energy Subsidized Economies, defined as having budgetary subsidies above 1.5% of GDP, on average in 2014 spent 4% of GDP on subsidizing energy. Resource rents permit administratively undemanding transfers to citizens to maintain political support. Once in place, benefitting groups will resist their removal, despite the resulting inefficient consumption and the lock-in risk caused by sustained low energy prices. Collapsing energy prices that deliver severe fiscal shocks combined with growing concerns over climate change damage make carefully designed reforms both urgent and politically more acceptable. Understanding their political logic suggests designing reforms that compensate the most vocal interest groups and there is evidence that this is increasingly recognized. The paper presents evidence on the magnitude and impacts of oil gas and electricity subsidies, and discusses how the electricity sector can be weaned of subsidies while reducing its carbon emissions.en
dc.publisherFaculty of Economics
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCambridge Working Papers in Economics
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserveden
dc.rights.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved/en
dc.subjectEnergy subsidies
dc.subjectinterest group politics
dc.subjectreforming electricity tariffs
dc.subjectPV
dc.titlePricing electricity and supporting renewables in Heavily Energy Subsidized Economies
dc.typeWorking Paper
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.1076


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