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dc.contributor.authorNewbery, D.
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-15T16:45:19Z
dc.date.available2018-01-15T16:45:19Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-21
dc.identifier.otherCWPE1715
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/270619
dc.description.abstractRenewable electricity, particularly solar PV, creates external benefits of learning-by-doing that drives down costs. If eventually economic, these technologies will thereafter create social value by reducing carbon emissions with value greater than the cost of abatement. This paper sets out a method for assessing whether a trajectory of investment that involves initial subsidies is justified by the subsequent learning-by-doing spillovers and whether it is worth accelerating current investment rates. Given current costs and learning rates, accelerating the current rate of investment appears globally socially beneficial, particularly if that investment is deployed in high insolation locations.
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCambridge Working Papers in Economics
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserveden
dc.rights.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved/en
dc.subjectSolar PV
dc.subjectlearning-by-doing
dc.subjectsubsidies
dc.subjectcarbon emissions
dc.titleHow to judge whether supporting solar PV is justified
dc.typeWorking Paper
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Cambridge
dc.publisher.departmentFaculty of Economics
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.17546


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