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dc.contributor.authorClaus, Lauraen
dc.contributor.authorde Rond, Marken
dc.contributor.authorHoward-Grenville, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorLodge, Janen
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-05T12:50:09Z
dc.date.available2018-09-05T12:50:09Z
dc.date.issued2019-04en
dc.identifier.issn0733-558X
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/279613
dc.description.abstractProlonged exposure to the lived experience of others—by observation as in ethnography or vicariously through interviews—can be deeply unsettling. Human misery is contagious. Some of what makes research unsettling is context specific. Thus, repeated encounters with, for example, those living life behind bars (Rogers, Corley, & Ashforth, 2016), victims of rape (Whiteman, 2010; Zilber, 2002), human trafficking and street-level sex workers (Eberhard, 2017), or drug addicts (Lawrence, 2017) will likely impact the one collecting data. Occasionally, contexts are not obviously unsettling but reveal incidents or exposure to the emotional experiences of others that can be. Research can also be experienced as deeply troubling for reasons not specific to context in forcing us to front up to moral questions around voyeurism and exploitation, the answers to which are often deeply personal.
dc.publisherEmerald
dc.titleWhen fieldwork hurts: on the lived experience of conducting research in unsettling contextsen
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage172
prism.publicationDate2019en
prism.publicationNameResearch in the Sociology of Organizationsen
prism.startingPage157
prism.volume59en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.26984
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-07-17en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1108/S0733-558X20190000059009en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-04en
dc.contributor.orcidHoward-Grenville, Jennifer [0000-0002-3737-0465]
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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