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dc.contributor.authorLeigh, Johnen
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-08T06:30:43Z
dc.date.available2018-09-08T06:30:43Z
dc.date.issued2018-07en
dc.identifier.issn1086-315X
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/279797
dc.description.abstractPlato said that humans reproduce not only to ensure the survival of the race, but also to overcome our own deaths — children preserve our memory and continue a bloodline. In his Confessions, and other works, Rousseau writes explicitly for a putative reader of the future, an inhabitant of a more enlightened posterity. It is in reaction both to these claims and to Rousseau’s notorious abandonment of his children, that — I think — Marmontel dedicates and shapes his own memoirs. This article looks at the first-person writing of Marmontel and other authors, examining a new trend for envisaging posterity incarnated more humbly in their children and thereby redeeming or excusing the vanity of which first-person writers had previously been accused.
dc.publisherJohns Hopkins University Press
dc.titlePosterity and Progeny: Memoirs and Autobiographical Writing in the Late Eighteenth Centuryen
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage92
prism.issueIdentifier1en
prism.publicationDate2018en
prism.publicationNameEighteenth Century Studiesen
prism.startingPage79
prism.volume40en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.27167
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-06-05en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/20563035.2018.1473072en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-07en
dc.identifier.eissn2056-3043
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.issuedOnline2018-06-19en
dc.identifier.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/20563035.2018.1473072en


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