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dc.contributor.authorVaghi, Matilde M
dc.contributor.authorCardinal, Rudolf
dc.contributor.authorApergis-Schoute, Annemieke M
dc.contributor.authorFineberg, Naomi A
dc.contributor.authorSule, Akeem
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, Trevor
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-22T00:30:17Z
dc.date.available2018-12-22T00:30:17Z
dc.date.issued2019-02
dc.identifier.issn2451-9022
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/287361
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: In obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), actions persist despite being inappropriate to the situation and without relationship to the overall goal. Dysfunctional beliefs have traditionally been postulated to underlie this condition. More recently, OCD has been characterized in terms of an imbalance between the goal-directed and the habit systems. To test these competing hypotheses, we used a novel experimental task designed to test subjective action-outcome knowledge of the effectiveness of actions (i.e., instrumental contingency), together with the balance between goal-directed and habitual responding. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients with OCD and 27 healthy control subjects were tested on a novel task involving the degradation of an action-outcome contingency. Sensitivity to instrumental contingency and the extent to which explicitly reported action-outcome knowledge guided behavior were probed by measuring response rate and subjectively reported judgments. RESULTS: Patients with OCD responded more than healthy control subjects in situations in which an action was less causally related to obtaining an outcome. However, patients showed intact explicit action-outcome knowledge, as assessed by self-report. In patients, the relationship between causality judgment and responding was altered; therefore, their actions were dissociated from explicit action-outcome knowledge. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate reduced sensitivity to instrumental contingency in OCD, reinforcing the notion of a deficient goal-directed system in this disorder. By showing a dissociation between subjectively reported action-outcome knowledge and behavior, the data provide experimental evidence for the ego-dystonic nature of OCD.
dc.description.sponsorshipWellcome Trust (104631/Z/14/Z, G00001354); Medical Research Council (G00001354); Pinsent Darwin Scholarship in Mental Pathology; Angharad Dodds John Bursary in Mental Health and Neuropsychiatry
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectHabits
dc.subjectGoals
dc.subjectLearning
dc.subjectJudgment
dc.subjectPsychomotor Performance
dc.subjectObsessive-Compulsive Disorder
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.titleAction-Outcome Knowledge Dissociates From Behavior in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Following Contingency Degradation.
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage209
prism.issueIdentifier2
prism.publicationDate2019
prism.publicationNameBiol Psychiatry Cogn Neurosci Neuroimaging
prism.startingPage200
prism.volume4
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.34665
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-09-18
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.bpsc.2018.09.014
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-02
dc.contributor.orcidCardinal, Rudolf [0000-0002-8751-5167]
dc.contributor.orcidRobbins, Trevor [0000-0003-0642-5977]
dc.identifier.eissn2451-9030
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (G1000183)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (093875/Z/10/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (104631/Z/14/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (G0001354)
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (MR/M009041/1)
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (MR/M024873/1)


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International