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dc.contributor.authorWass, Sam V
dc.contributor.authorNoreika, Valdas
dc.contributor.authorGeorgieva, Stanimira
dc.contributor.authorClackson, Kaili
dc.contributor.authorBrightman, Laura
dc.contributor.authorNutbrown, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorCovarrubias, Lorena Santamaria
dc.contributor.authorLeong, Victoria
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-22T00:31:04Z
dc.date.available2018-12-22T00:31:04Z
dc.date.issued2018-12
dc.identifier.issn1544-9173
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/287389
dc.description.abstractAlmost all attention and learning-in particular, most early learning-take place in social settings. But little is known of how our brains support dynamic social interactions. We recorded dual electroencephalography (EEG) from 12-month-old infants and parents during solo play and joint play. During solo play, fluctuations in infants' theta power significantly forward-predicted their subsequent attentional behaviours. However, this forward-predictiveness was lower during joint play than solo play, suggesting that infants' endogenous neural control over attention is greater during solo play. Overall, however, infants were more attentive to the objects during joint play. To understand why, we examined how adult brain activity related to infant attention. We found that parents' theta power closely tracked and responded to changes in their infants' attention. Further, instances in which parents showed greater neural responsivity were associated with longer sustained attention by infants. Our results offer new insights into how one partner influences another during social interaction.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research was funded by ESRC Grant numbers ES/N006461/1 to VL and SW, ES/N017560/1 to SW
dc.format.mediumElectronic-eCollection
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectBrain
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectElectroencephalography
dc.subjectFamily
dc.subjectParents
dc.subjectMothers
dc.subjectInterpersonal Relations
dc.subjectComprehension
dc.subjectLearning
dc.subjectAttention
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectInfant
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.titleParental neural responsivity to infants' visual attention: How mature brains influence immature brains during social interaction.
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier12
prism.publicationDate2018
prism.publicationNamePLoS Biol
prism.startingPagee2006328
prism.volume16
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.34693
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-11-09
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1371/journal.pbio.2006328
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-12-13
dc.contributor.orcidWass, Sam V [0000-0002-7421-3493]
dc.identifier.eissn1545-7885
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idEconomic and Social Research Council (ES/N006461/1)
cam.issuedOnline2018-12-13


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International