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dc.contributor.authorKesküla, E
dc.contributor.authorSanchez, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-22T00:30:29Z
dc.date.available2019-01-22T00:30:29Z
dc.date.issued2019-03
dc.identifier.issn0304-4092
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/288285
dc.description.abstractEmployees in global workplaces commonly suggest they are being failed by trade union representatives that betray the political ideals of their institutions. The tenacity of this discourse requires interrogation, since the notion persists even in contexts that lack evidence of such practices occurring. Based upon a comparison of Kazakhstan and India, we suggest that there is a fundamental slippage between the emotive aspect of union politics and the banal realties of institutional processes. We explore how conservative and radical trade unions alike rely upon appeals to an affect of struggle, in order to rationalize their work as part of an international and historically continuous political project. The paper explains why it is in the bureaucratic nature of trade unions to betray such an affect.
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleEveryday barricades: bureaucracy and the affect of struggle in trade unions
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage125
prism.issueIdentifier1
prism.publicationDate2019
prism.publicationNameDialectical Anthropology
prism.startingPage109
prism.volume43
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.35601
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-11-24
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s10624-018-9535-4
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-03-05
dc.identifier.eissn1573-0786
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
cam.issuedOnline2019-01-02


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International