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dc.contributor.authorMacLeod, KJ
dc.contributor.authorBrekke, P
dc.contributor.authorEwen, JG
dc.contributor.authorThorogood, Rose
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-09T13:10:35Z
dc.date.available2019-04-09T13:10:35Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-01
dc.identifier.issn0003-3472
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/291338
dc.description.abstractSize hierarchies are often seen when nestlings hatch asynchronously over a period of days. Shorter hatch periods are common across passerines, however, and while these may also give rise to asymmetries, their effects are rarely considered. Regardless of hatch period, the long-term consequences for later hatched nestlings that survive to fledge is unknown for wild birds. Here we explored the timing of hatch order in a free-living population of hihi nestlings, Notiomystis cincta, and followed any effects in and out of the nest. We found that while hatching time from first- to last-hatched nestlings was often less than 24 h, last-hatched individuals grew more slowly and were lighter and smaller at fledging than older siblings. Last-hatched nestlings were also less likely to fledge. These effects were greater in larger broods. Adult body size is correlated with fledging size in hihi; however, we found no evidence that hatch order affected longevity postfledging, or lifetime reproductive success. We then explored whether carotenoid availability might buffer these stressful rearing conditions (through food supplementation of parents) but found no evidence that increased access to carotenoids for mothers and/or growing nestlings influenced incubation schedules, or the effects of hatching late. Together these results suggest that while even a very short hatch period can influence adult phenotype, hatching asynchrony is not maladaptive for hihi: when last-hatched nestlings survive to fledge they can contribute as much to their mothers' fitness as first-hatched siblings.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.titleMinutes matter: brief hatching asynchrony adversely affects late-hatched hihi nestlings, but not life beyond the nest
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage118
prism.publicationDate2016
prism.publicationNameAnimal Behaviour
prism.startingPage111
prism.volume119
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.38514
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-06-10
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.07.002
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-09-01
dc.contributor.orcidThorogood, Rose [0000-0001-5010-2177]
dc.identifier.eissn1095-8282
dc.publisher.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000334721630118X?via%3Dihub#!
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idNatural Environment Research Council (NE/K00929X/1)
cam.issuedOnline2016-07-25
dc.identifier.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000334721630118X?via%3Dihub#!
datacite.issupplementedby.doi10.17863/CAM.517


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