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dc.contributor.authorPsarras, Harisen
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-26T14:22:24Z
dc.date.available2019-04-26T14:22:24Z
dc.date.issued2015-01-15en
dc.identifier.issn0964-6639en
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/292023
dc.description.abstractFirst Paragraph: The irrationality of totalitarianism, as manifested throughout the 20th century, reinforced an old liberal desideratum. Reason, liberal theorists argue, requires political institutions to affirm what totalitarianism ruthlessly opposed, that is, the freedom of thought, belief and religion. In fact, political institutions should show equal respect towards different world views held by individuals falling under their authority. But the plurality of world views, whose protection is grounded on an appeal to reason, often entails a plurality of opposing views on reason itself. It is this complexity that we find allusively encapsulated in the subtitle of Todd Hedrick’s monograph Reason, Pluralism and the Claims of Political Philosophy. This is a fascinating topic that would probably be discouragingly broad, had it not been narrowed down through Hedrick’s focus on its treatment by Rawls and Habermas, as the book’s main title suggests.en
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherSAGEen
dc.title[Book Review] TODD HEDRICK, Rawls and Habermas: Reason, Pluralism and the Claims of Political Philosophy. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2010, pp. x þ 242, ISBN 9780804770774, $65 (hbk).en
dc.typeOther
prism.endingPage138
prism.issueIdentifier1en
prism.publicationDate2015en
prism.publicationNameSocial and Legal Studiesen
prism.startingPage135
prism.volume24en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.39176
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-01-15en
dc.contributor.orcidPsarras, Haris [0000-0003-2473-4335]
rioxxterms.typeOtheren


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