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dc.contributor.authorHouldcroft, Charlotteen
dc.contributor.authorRifkin, Riaan Fen
dc.contributor.authorUnderdown, Simon Jen
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-17T23:30:07Z
dc.date.available2019-07-17T23:30:07Z
dc.date.issued2019-03en
dc.identifier.issn0301-4460
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/294720
dc.description.abstractThe development of ancient DNA (aDNA) analysis has radically transformed how we think about and study the past. The use of aDNA technology has permeated almost every area of anthropology and archaeology and continues to radically alter how we understand the past (Paabo et al. 1989, 2004; Meyer et al. 2016; Slon et al. 2017). Ancient DNA has both vastly enriched and complicated the mosaic picture of the human story from Neanderthals and Homo sapiens interbreeding to the identification of the hitherto unknown Denisovan group (Slon et al. 2017). aDNA has revolutionised the fields of archaeology, population genetics and evolutionary biology, allowing us to directly test hypotheses about past populations which could formerly only be inferred from other lines of evidence. aDNA has also revealed new species, challenged assumptions about admixture and demonstrated that processes such as animal and plant domestication are even more complex than we had assumed. Currently, the oldest aDNA (from a horse) is dated to 700,000 years ago (Orlando et al. 2013) and the oldest human aDNA to 400,000 years ago (Meyer et al. 2016), potentially opening up much of human prehistory to this new field. However, there are also questions which cannot currently be answered by aDNA, whether because of the age or nature of a sample, the preservation conditions or ethical considerations, including engagement with indigenous and marginalised groups. These themes were explored by the participants of the 59th Society for the Study of Human Biology Symposium held in August 2018 at Oxford Brookes University, UK.
dc.description.sponsorshipNot funded (editorial for journal special edition)
dc.format.mediumPrinten
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.rights.uri
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectGenetic Predisposition to Diseaseen
dc.subjectArchaeologyen
dc.subjectHistory, Ancienten
dc.subjectBiological Evolutionen
dc.subjectHuman Migrationen
dc.subjectDomesticationen
dc.subjectDNA, Ancienten
dc.titleHuman biology and ancient DNA: exploring disease, domestication and movement.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage98
prism.issueIdentifier2en
prism.publicationDate2019en
prism.publicationNameAnnals of human biologyen
prism.startingPage95
prism.volume46en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.41823
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-06-28en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/03014460.2019.1629536en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-03en
dc.contributor.orcidHouldcroft, Charlotte [0000-0002-1833-5285]
dc.contributor.orcidRifkin, Riaan F [0000-0003-1791-3706]
dc.contributor.orcidUnderdown, Simon J [0000-0001-6056-2353]
dc.identifier.eissn1464-5033
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 10:41:52 GMT 2020 - Embargo updated*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2020-03-31


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