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dc.contributor.authorBagheri, Aen
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Aen
dc.contributor.authorAl-Attar, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Oen
dc.contributor.authorGiardini, Den
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-06T23:31:09Z
dc.date.available2019-09-06T23:31:09Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-01en
dc.identifier.issn2169-9097
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/296534
dc.description.abstractWe employ laboratory-based grain-size- and temperature-sensitive rheological models to 16 describe the viscoelastic behavior of terrestrial bodies with focus on Mars. Shear modulus 17 reduction and attenuation related to viscoelastic relaxation occur as a result of diffusion- 18 and dislocation-related creep and grain-boundary processes. We consider five rheological 19 models, including extended Burgers, Andrade, Sundberg-Cooper, a power-law approxima- 20 tion, and Maxwell, and determine Martian tidal response. However, the question of which 21 model provides the most appropriate description of dissipation in planetary bodies, re- 22 mains an open issue. To examine this, crust and mantle models (density and elasticity) are 23 computed self-consistently through phase equilibrium calculations as a function of pres- 24 sure, temperature, and bulk composition, whereas core properties are based on an Fe-FeS 25 parameterisation. We assess the compatibility of the viscoelastic models by inverting the 26 available geophysical data for Mars (tidal response and mean density and moment of in- 27 ertia) for temperature, elastic, and attenuation structure. Our results show that although 28 all viscoelastic models are consistent with data, their predictions for the tidal response at 29 other periods and harmonic degrees are distinct. The results also show that Maxwell is 30 only capable of fitting data for unrealistically low viscosities. Our approach can be used 31 quantitatively to distinguish between the viscoelastic models from seismic and/or tidal ob- 32 servations that will allow for improved constraints on interior structure (e.g., with InSight). 33 Finally, the methodology presented here is generally formulated and applicable to other so- 34 lar and extra-solar system bodies where the study of tidal dissipation presents an important 35 means for determining interior structure.
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Union (AGU)
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.rights.uri
dc.titleTidal Response of Mars Constrained From Laboratory-Based Viscoelastic Dissipation Models and Geophysical Dataen
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage2727
prism.issueIdentifier11en
prism.publicationDate2019en
prism.publicationNameJournal of Geophysical Research: Planetsen
prism.startingPage2703
prism.volume124en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.43581
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-08-02en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1029/2019JE006015en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-11-01en
dc.contributor.orcidBagheri, A [0000-0002-2306-2576]
dc.contributor.orcidKhan, A [0000-0003-4462-3173]
dc.contributor.orcidAl-Attar, David [0000-0003-1006-8327]
dc.contributor.orcidGiardini, D [0000-0002-5573-7638]
dc.identifier.eissn2169-9100
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 10:40:48 GMT 2020 - Embargo updated*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2020-05-01


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