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dc.contributor.authorEvans, Isobel EMen
dc.contributor.authorMartyr, Anthonyen
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Rachelen
dc.contributor.authorBrayne, Carolen
dc.contributor.authorClare, Lindaen
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-17T23:30:37Z
dc.date.available2019-09-17T23:30:37Z
dc.identifier.issn1387-2877
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/296909
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: There is some evidence to suggest that social isolation may be associated with poor cognitive function in later life. However, findings are inconsistent and there is wide variation in the measures used to assess social isolation. OBJECTIVE: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the association between social isolation and cognitive function in later life. METHODS: A search for longitudinal studies assessing the relationship between aspects of social isolation (including social activity and social networks) and cognitive function (including global measures of cognition, memory, and executive function) was conducted in PsycInfo, CINAHL, PubMed, and AgeLine. A random effects meta-analysis was conducted to assess the overall association between measures of social isolation and cognitive function. Sub-analyses investigated the association between different aspects of social isolation and each of the measures of cognitive function. RESULTS: Sixty-five articles were identified by the systematic review and 51 articles were included in the meta-analysis. Low levels of social isolation characterized by high engagement in social activity and large social networks were associated with better late-life cognitive function (r = 0.054, 95% CI: 0.043, 0.065). Sub-analyses suggested that the association between social isolation and measures of global cognitive function, memory, and executive function were similar and there was no difference according to gender or number of years follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Aspects of social isolation are associated with cognitive function in later life. There is wide variation in approaches to measuring social activity and social networks across studies which may contribute to inconsistencies in reported findings.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe are grateful to the Alzheimer’s Society for funding a PhD scholarship for Isobel Evans to complete this work through the following grant: Transdisciplinary training for dementia research in CFAS (The Alzheimer’s Society CFAS Doctoral Training Centre). 2015–2018. AS-DTC-2014-027.
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherIOS Press
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectAgingen
dc.subjectcognitionen
dc.subjectcognitive reserveen
dc.subjectsocial isolationen
dc.titleSocial Isolation and Cognitive Function in Later Life: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPageS144
prism.issueIdentifiers1en
prism.publicationNameJournal of Alzheimer's Diseaseen
prism.startingPageS119
prism.volume70en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.43950
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-08-31en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3233/JAD-180501en
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-08-31en
dc.contributor.orcidBrayne, Carol [0000-0001-5307-663X]
dc.identifier.eissn1875-8908
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idAlzheimer's Society (226 (AS-DTC-2014-027))
cam.issuedOnline2019-08-13en


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Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International