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dc.contributor.authorNanditha, Arun
dc.contributor.authorThomson, Hazel
dc.contributor.authorSusairaj, Priscilla
dc.contributor.authorSrivanichakorn, Weerachai
dc.contributor.authorOliver, Nick
dc.contributor.authorGodsland, Ian F
dc.contributor.authorMajeed, Azeem
dc.contributor.authorDarzi, Ara
dc.contributor.authorSatheesh, Krishnamoorthy
dc.contributor.authorSimon, Mary
dc.contributor.authorRaghavan, Arun
dc.contributor.authorVinitha, Ramachandran
dc.contributor.authorSnehalatha, Chamukuttan
dc.contributor.authorWestgate, Kate
dc.contributor.authorBrage, Soren
dc.contributor.authorSharp, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorWareham, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Desmond G
dc.contributor.authorRamachandran, Ambady
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-06T01:12:38Z
dc.date.available2019-11-06T01:12:38Z
dc.date.issued2020-03
dc.identifier.issn0012-186X
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/298711
dc.description.abstractAIMS/HYPOTHESIS: This randomised controlled trial was performed in India and the UK in people with prediabetes to study whether mobile phone short message service (SMS) text messages can be used to motivate and educate people to follow lifestyle modifications, to prevent type 2 diabetes. METHODS: The study was performed in people with prediabetes (n = 2062; control: n = 1031; intervention: n = 1031) defined by HbA1c ≥42 and ≤47 mmol/mol (≥6.0% and ≤6.4%). Participants were recruited from public and private sector organisations in India (men and women aged 35-55 years) and by the National Health Service (NHS) Health Checks programme in the UK (aged 40-74 years without pre-existing diabetes, cardiovascular disease or kidney disease). Allocation to the study groups was performed using a computer-generated sequence (1:1) in India and by stratified randomisation in permuted blocks in the UK. Investigators in both countries remained blinded throughout the study period. All participants received advice on a healthy lifestyle at baseline. The intervention group in addition received supportive text messages using mobile phone SMS messages 2-3 times per week. Participants were assessed at baseline and at 6, 12 and 24 months. The primary outcome was conversion to type 2 diabetes and secondary outcomes included anthropometry, biochemistry, dietary and physical activity changes, blood pressure and quality of life. RESULTS: At the 2 year follow-up (n = 2062; control: n = 1031; intervention: n = 1031), in the intention-to-treat population the HR for development of type 2 diabetes calculated using a discrete-time proportional hazards model was 0.89 (95% CI 0.74, 1.07; p = 0.22). There were no significant differences in the secondary outcomes. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: This trial in two countries with varied ethnic and cultural backgrounds showed no significant reduction in the progression to diabetes in 2 years by lifestyle modification using SMS messaging. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The primary study was registered on www.ClinicalTrials.gov (India, NCT01570946; UK, NCT01795833). FUNDING: The study was funded jointly by the Indian Council for Medical Research and the UK Medical Research Council.
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding was obtained jointly from the Indian Council for Medical Research (Ref. No. 58/1/6/ICMR-MRC/2009-NCD-II) and the UK Medical Research Council (Joint funding ref: MR/J000183/1). NJW, SJS, SB and KW are supported by the Medical Research Council (MC_UU_12015/1 and MC_UU_12015/3).
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2
dc.subjectPrediabetic State
dc.subjectHyperglycemia
dc.subjectBlood Glucose
dc.subjectMonitoring, Physiologic
dc.subjectSample Size
dc.subjectProgram Evaluation
dc.subjectRisk Reduction Behavior
dc.subjectLife Style
dc.subjectPreventive Medicine
dc.subjectTelemedicine
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectIndia
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectText Messaging
dc.subjectUnited Kingdom
dc.subjectGlycated Hemoglobin A
dc.subjectCell Phone
dc.titleA pragmatic and scalable strategy using mobile technology to promote sustained lifestyle changes to prevent type 2 diabetes in India and the UK: a randomised controlled trial.
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage496
prism.issueIdentifier3
prism.publicationDate2020
prism.publicationNameDiabetologia
prism.startingPage486
prism.volume63
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.45767
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-11-01
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s00125-019-05061-y
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-03
dc.contributor.orcidWestgate, Kate [0000-0002-0283-3562]
dc.contributor.orcidBrage, Soren [0000-0002-1265-7355]
dc.contributor.orcidSharp, Stephen [0000-0003-2375-1440]
dc.contributor.orcidWareham, Nicholas [0000-0003-1422-2993]
dc.contributor.orcidRamachandran, Ambady [0000-0001-8313-0502]
dc.identifier.eissn1432-0428
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (MC_UU_12015/1)
pubs.funder-project-idDepartment of Health (via National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)) (NF-SI-0617-10149)
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (MC_UU_12015/3)
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (MR/J000183/1)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_00006/4)
cam.issuedOnline2020-01-09
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 10:36:05 GMT 2020 - Embargo updated
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International