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dc.contributor.authorLawton, Jen
dc.contributor.authorKimbell, Ben
dc.contributor.authorRankin, Den
dc.contributor.authorAshcroft, NLen
dc.contributor.authorVarghese, Len
dc.contributor.authorAllen, JMen
dc.contributor.authorBoughton, Charlotteen
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Fen
dc.contributor.authorRandell, Ten
dc.contributor.authorBesser, REJen
dc.contributor.authorTrevelyan, Nen
dc.contributor.authorHovorka, Romanen
dc.contributor.authorCLOuD Consortium,en
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-21T00:31:10Z
dc.date.available2019-12-21T00:31:10Z
dc.date.issued2020-06en
dc.identifier.issn0742-3071
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/300236
dc.description.abstractAims To explore health professionals’ views about who would benefit from using a closed-loop system and who should be prioritised for access to the technology in routine clinical care. Methods Health professionals (n=22) delivering the Closed Loop from Onset in type 1 Diabetes (CLOuD) trial were interviewed after they had ≥6 months experience supporting participants using a closed-loop system. Data were analysed thematically. Results Interviewees described holding strong assumptions about the kinds of people who would use the technology effectively prior to the trial. Interviewees described changing their views as a result of observing individuals engaging with the closed-loop system in ways they had not anticipated. This included educated, technologically competent individuals who over-interacted with the system in ways which could compromise glycaemic control. Other individuals, who health professionals assumed would struggle to understand and use the technology, were reported to have benefited from it because they stood back and allowed the system to operate without interference. Interviewees concluded that individual, family, and psychological attributes cannot be used as pre-selection criteria and, ideally, all individuals should be given the chance to try the technology. However, it was recognised that clinical guidelines will be needed to inform difficult decisions about treatment allocation (and withdrawal), with young children and infants being considered priority groups. Conclusions To ensure fair and equitable access to closed-loop systems, prejudicial and stereotypical assumptions held by health professionals may need to be addressed. To support their decision-making, clinical guidelines need to be made available in a timely manner.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.rights.uri
dc.subjectCLOuD Consortiumen
dc.titleHealth professionals' views about who would benefit from using a closed-loop system: a qualitative study.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage1037
prism.issueIdentifier6en
prism.publicationDate2020en
prism.publicationNameDiabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Associationen
prism.startingPage1030
prism.volume37en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.47309
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-01-23en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/dme.14252en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-06en
dc.contributor.orcidLawton, J [0000-0002-8016-7374]
dc.contributor.orcidRankin, D [0000-0002-5835-3402]
dc.contributor.orcidBoughton, Charlotte [0000-0003-3272-9544]
dc.contributor.orcidHovorka, Roman [0000-0003-2901-461X]
dc.identifier.eissn1464-5491
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idCambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH) (146281)
pubs.funder-project-idHelmsley Charitable Trust (#2016PG-T1D045)
pubs.funder-project-idDepartment of Health (via National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)) (EME 14/23/09)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (100574/Z/12/Z)
cam.orpheus.successTue Mar 31 10:38:27 BST 2020 - Embargo updated*
cam.orpheus.counter2*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2021-01-27


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