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dc.contributor.authorGaffney, Hannahen
dc.contributor.authorTtofi, Mariaen
dc.contributor.authorFarrington, David Pen
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-27T15:03:45Z
dc.date.available2021-01-27T15:03:45Z
dc.date.issued2021-04en
dc.identifier.issn0022-4405
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/316770
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has shown that many school-based anti-bullying programs are effective. A prior meta-analysis (Gaffney, Ttofi, & Farrington, 2019) found that intervention programs are effective in reducing school-bullying perpetration by approximately 19–20% and school-bullying victimization by approximately 15–16%. Using data from this prior meta-analysis, the aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between effectiveness estimates and specific elements of anti-bullying programs. Specific intervention components in line with a socio-ecological framework were coded as present or absent. Components were coded on the following levels: school, classroom, teacher, parent, peer, individual, and intervention. Meta-analytical subgroup compar- isons analogous to ANOVA were computed to examine the relationship between the presence of specific components and the effectiveness in reducing bullying perpetration (n = 82) and vic- timization (n = 86). Results indicated that the presence of a number of intervention components (e.g., whole-school approach, anti-bullying policies, classroom rules, information for parents, in- formal peer involvement, and work with victims) were significantly associated with larger effect sizes for school-bullying perpetration outcomes. The presence of informal peer involvement and information for parents were associated with larger effect sizes for school-bullying victimization outcomes. Meta-regression analyses showed no significant relationship between effectiveness and the number of intervention components included in a program. The present report contributes to the understanding of 'what works' in reducing school-bullying perpetration and victimization. The impact of these findings on future anti-bullying research is discussed.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.titleWhat works in anti-bullying programs? Analysis of effective intervention components.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage56
prism.publicationDate2021en
prism.publicationNameJournal of school psychologyen
prism.startingPage37
prism.volume85en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.63884
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-12-12en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.jsp.2020.12.002en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-04en
dc.contributor.orcidGaffney, Hannah [0000-0001-9677-0218]
dc.identifier.eissn1873-3506
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idESRC (1810768)
cam.orpheus.successMon Feb 15 07:30:56 GMT 2021 - Embargo updated*
cam.orpheus.counter2*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2023-04-01


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International