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  • ItemAccepted versionOpen Access
    A Jewish marriage deed from nineteenth-century Yemen
    Outhwaite, BM; Ashur, Amir; Outhwaite, Ben [0000-0003-3018-283X]
    The article presents a Jewish marriage deed, a ketubba, which was written in Ṣanʿāʾ in 1899 CE and later found among the Genizah manuscripts brought out of Egypt. It was written in Aramaic, Hebrew and Judaeo-Arabic by a skilled scribe, and is, in fact, a replacement deed, written instead of one that had previously been lost by the couple. On the back it includes arrangements for paying back money that the husband owes his wife. The contract is evidence of the skill of its scribe and the pious adherence of the Jewish community of Yemen to all the legal and traditional aspects of marriage, passed down to them over the centuries. The couple must have left Yemen for Egypt sometime after 1899 and before 1912, when the deed was acquired by Jack Mosseri, an Egyptian Jewish collector of manuscripts.
  • ItemAccepted versionOpen Access
    Conversations with Sir John Hamilton Baker QC: Aspects of Resolving the Legal History of the Common Law
    Dingle, L; Dingle, Lesley [0000-0002-9070-6255]
    Abstract Professor Sir John Baker was born in Sheffield in April 1944 towards the end of the Second World War. His path into Legal History was via the Edward VI Grammar School in Chelmsford, and University College London in the early 60s. It was his good fortune that lecturing arrangements still in place at UCL as a wartime legacy caused him to fall under the inspirational guidance of Professor Toby Milsom at LSE for his Legal History tuition. By the time John Baker moved to Cambridge in 1971 he had been called to the Bar at the Inner Temple, and his interest in the development of the common law in the late mediaeval/early Tudor period was firmly grounded. The next forty years were spent at Cambridge, where he established an enviable reputation as an innovative and meticulous scholar, whose publications output has become legendary. He retired from the Downing Chair of the Laws of England in 2011, and was knighted for his services to Legal History in 2003. This article by Lesley Dingle attempts to highlight some aspects of Professor Baker’s illustrious career, and should be read in conjunction with his entry in the Cambridge Eminent Scholars Archive, both of which are based on interviews that she conducted with Sir John in the Law Faculty in February-March 2017.
  • ItemAccepted versionOpen Access
    Workplace Research for Cataloguers: What's Stopping You?
    Sewell, CE; Sewell, Claire [0000-0003-1669-7861]
    For those outside academia, the word research can offer a scary image. People often picture a scientist in a lab surrounded by test tubes or a historian pouring over ancient documents which can seem miles away from the daily role of a cataloguer. However as the Harlem Renaissance writer Zora Neale Hurston says in the quote above, research is really just a formal way of being curious. It offers a chance to find out about something following a defined set of guidelines. Given that cataloguers are known problem solvers who enjoy following rules, workplace research is a great fit for their skill set. This article will look at how cataloguers can fit research into their role, what they can investigate and showcase some different ways they can communicate their results to the wider world.
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Academic Profile, Network and Collaboration Analysis : Use Cases for the University
    (2017-09-21) Wastl, Juergen; Wastl, Juergen [0000-0001-7757-8001]
    Recent years saw the emergence of research information systems (RIS) in University IT portfolios. The increasing number of local RIS show the need for the institutions to provide tools for its academic and administrative staff as well as for senior management for making strategic decision or complying with reporting requirements. This seminar lecture focuses on trends and challenges in managing implementations of RIS from an institutional view: Data curation and data quality issues form the basis of the quest for a fit-for-purpose, efficient and sustainable RIS. Examples based around interconnectivity will exploit the application of data standards to increase efficiency and sustainability in research information matters. Previously used for retrospective mandatory reporting requirements (e.g. peer review evaluation in REF, funder post-award reports), RIS expand to more than that: Academic Profiles, network and collaboration analysis form part of latest developments to futureproof the University RIS to become a pro-active tool used by academics in their day-to-day business.
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Forschungsinformationssysteme: Not oder Tugend?
    (Dinges & Frick, 2017-05-23) Wastl, J; Wastl, Juergen [0000-0001-7757-8001]
    Cambridge University decided to implement a research information system (CRIS) to collect and validate meta-data in order to comply with the UK REF requirements. This marked the foundation of a tool primarily based on publication meta-data. It assists to inform not only REF but other mandatory reporting requirements (e.g. RCUK via Researchfish or other Funder reporting requests). Due to the increased level of interoperability, the Cambridge CRIS is now capable of not only reporting retrospectively, but also to aid and inform academics and administrators in their day-to-day business. This paper exploits some examples based around interconnectivity, application of data standards and network analysis to showcase the increase in efficiency and sustainability in research information matters.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Mind the (Research Information) Map
    (2015-08-11) Wastl, Juergen; Byrne, Emma; Wastl, Juergen [0000-0001-7757-8001]; Byrne, Emma [0000-0001-6015-8684]
  • ItemAccepted versionOpen Access
    Let's Talk - Interoperability between University CRIS/IR and Researchfish: A Case Study from the UK
    (Elsevier BV, 2017) Clements, A; Reddick, G; Viney, I; McCutcheon, V; Toon, J; Macandrew, H; McArdle, I; Collet, S; Wastl, J; Wastl, Juergen [0000-0001-7757-8001]
    Research funders and research organisations both require feedback on the progress, productivity and quality of the research they support. This information originates with researchers, but may be captured in a variety of systems including University CRIS/IR and funder systems. In 2014 all 7 national Research Councils (collectively referred to as RCUK) implemented a harmonised approach to the collection of research output data, currently supported by Researchfish Ltd (referred to as the Researchfish® system). In 2016 this process is gathering feedback from over 60,000 researchers in all UK Universities, and for funders in the USA, Canada, Denmark and the Netherlands, tracking more than £40billion of public and charity research investment and is adding to a dataset of more than 1.5 million outputs. Researchers, research managers and funders want to find ways to capture this data once and achieve wide re-use of the information. Working together University and Research Council officers, Researchfish Ltd. and Jisc have highlighted that it is important for the “interoperability” between research information systems to be improved. These organisations have started a programme of work to improve the bi-directional flow of information between University and funder systems.
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Let’s Talk – Interoperability between University CRIS/IR and Researchfish : a case study from the UK
    (Elsevier, 2017-03-21) Clements, Anna; Reddick, Gavin; Viney, Ian; McCutcheon, Valerie; Toon, James; Macandrew, Hamish; McArdle, Ian; Collet, Sophie; Wastl, Juergen
    Research funders and research organisations both require feedback on the progress, productivity and quality of the research they support. This information originates with researchers, but may be captured in a variety of systems including University CRIS/IR and funder systems. In 2014 all 7 national Research Councils (collectively referred to as RCUK) implemented a harmonised approach to the collection of research output data, currently supported by Researchfish Ltd (referred to as the Researchfish® system). In 2016 this process is gathering feedback from over 60,000 researchers in all UK Universities, and for funders in the USA, Canada, Denmark and the Netherlands, tracking more than £40billion of public and charity research investment and is adding to a dataset of more than 1.5 million outputs. Researchers, research managers and funders want to find ways to capture this data once and achieve wide re-use of the information. Working together University and Research Council officers, Researchfish Ltd. and Jisc have highlighted that it is important for the “interoperability” between research information systems to be improved. These organisations have started a programme of work to improve the bi-directional flow of information between University and funder systems.
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Research information standards adoption: Development of a visual insight tool at the University of Cambridge
    (Elsevier, 2016) Riechert, Mathias; Roberson, Owen; Wastl, Jürgen; Roberson, Owen [0000-0001-6938-5162]; Wastl, Jürgen [0000-0001-7757-8001]
    While Research Information continues to mature as an area of expertise, discussions regarding the implementation and adoption of standardisation initiatives, such as CASRAI and CERIF, have intensified. Possessing the capacity to use a standard does not obligate its adoption, so the extent to which standards are employed varies across use cases and institutions, in a way that is difficult to qualify and determine. We are presenting a light-weight visualisation framework for presenting, comparing and improving the adoption of research information standards for research institutions. The framework is implemented for providing insight into identifier adoption at the University of Cambridge. The tool is easy to deploy and implement, and the insights it generates are intended to express clearly the extent to which Research Information standards have been adopted. Furthermore, the framework can be used to make this adoption knowledge available as linked open data held at a local level, reducing the need for costly metastudies and helping the standardisation community to monitor and focus standardisation development.