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An internationally competitive research programme; themes include cell signalling and control of gene expression, to molecular microbiology, plant molecular biology and biofuel research, cancer and cardiovascular biology

The Department of Biochemistry is a member of the School of Biological Sciences and is one of the largest departments in Cambridge - around 400 research and support staff - with an internationally competitive research programme. The Department’s research contributes to the themes that describe the research in the School. We have attracted many outstanding independent research fellows with funding from the Wellcome Trust, British Heart Foundation, BBSRC and MRC, and several of our senior staff have been seconded to prestigious fellowships. The Department houses facilities funded by Wellcome Trust, BBSRC and MRC for modern biomolecular research, including an 800MHz NMR facility, modern X-ray laboratories, core facilities for mass spectrometry and plasmon resonance, advanced services for protein and nucleic acid sequencing. We have collaborated with the Department of Genetics in establishing the Systems Biology Centre, adjacent to the Sanger Building, which houses array technologies, proteomics and informatics, and we have established metabolomics elsewhere in the Department. We also participate in the new Wellcome Trust Centre for Stem Cell Research. These new developments underpin research in a range of different biological processes from molecular enzymology, through cell signalling and control of gene expression, to molecular microbiology, plant molecular biology and biofuel research, cancer and cardiovascular biology.

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  • Molecular mechanism of Trypanosoma brucei Aquaglyceroporin 2 

    Sprenger, Teresa
    Trypanosoma brucei subspecies cause Human African Trypanosomiasis, which is fatal unless treated. T. brucei Aquaglyceroporin 2 (TbAQP2) is required for the uptake of two of the drugs used clinically, pentamidine and ...
  • Elucidating p53’s physiological and tumourigenic roles 

    Lam, Chun
    The key role of p53 as a tumour suppressor is widely acknowledged and based on many observations that p53 suppresses oncogene-mediated transformation of rodent fibroblasts and is the most frequently mutated gene in human ...
  • Molecular interactions of plant cell wall polymers 

    Terrett, Oliver (2020-07)
    Specialised plant cells produce thickened cell walls, called secondary cell walls comprised of lignocellulose. The main polymers in lignocellulose are cellulose, xylan, galactoglucomannan and lignin. Lignocellulose forms ...
  • The Ancestry and Function of Cytochrome c6A 

    Slater, Barnaby (2020-05-16)
    Cytochrome c6A is a homologue of cytochrome c6 found in eukaryotic green algae and higher plants. However it is thought to perform a different function from cytochrome c6. Two current hypotheses exist for this function: ...

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