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Combines expertise in the central traditional fields of social anthropology with active explorations of new areas of study

The Department of Social Anthropology at Cambridge is a major centre for anthropological research. It combines expertise in the central traditional fields of social anthropology with active explorations of new areas of study. Most of the main anthropological fields of kinship, religion and ritual, economics, law and politics are studied.

Particular current interests in the department include gender relations, comparative sociology, modes of communication, medical anthropology, demographic anthropology, urban studies, philosophy and anthropology, historical anthropology, symbolic systems, economic and development anthropology, ethnicity, history of anthropology, art and aesthetics.

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  • Zoya Chokaeva, about Kalmyk holidays 

    Terbish, Baasanjav (Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge, 2019-04-22)
    Zoya says that all holidays are connected with Buddhism. Zul is a birthday during which all women add a year to their age. The week after Zul, called ‘Jilin Noyon’ (Master of the Year), is when men add a year to their age. ...
  • Rimma Badmaeva, About Zul and Tsagan Sar 

    Terbish, Baasanjav (Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge, 2019-04-22)
    During Zul and Tsagan Sar people make biscuits, tea, and cook meat. Different biscuits have different meanings and symbolisms. During Tsagan Sar people make a variety of biscuits, whereas during Zul – simple biscuits. ...
  • Evdokia Erdnieva, Zul and Tsagan Sar 

    Terbish, Baasanjav (Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge, 2019-05-04)
    Evdokia talks about how people celebrate Zul and Tsagan Sar: For Zul, people make biscuits, light candles, and invite their relatives to their homes. Before the celebrations, people collect special grass the stems of which ...
  • Bosya Barzueva, about Zul 

    Terbish, Baasanjav (Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge, 2019-05-07)
    Bosya says the following: For Zul people made candles called ‘a boat of life’. The candlewicks were made from wild grass stalks. Each wick had the same number of grass stalks as the age of the person to whom it was dedicated. ...

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