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Combines expertise in the central traditional fields of social anthropology with active explorations of new areas of study

The Department of Social Anthropology at Cambridge is a major centre for anthropological research. It combines expertise in the central traditional fields of social anthropology with active explorations of new areas of study. Most of the main anthropological fields of kinship, religion and ritual, economics, law and politics are studied.

Particular current interests in the department include gender relations, comparative sociology, modes of communication, medical anthropology, demographic anthropology, urban studies, philosophy and anthropology, historical anthropology, symbolic systems, economic and development anthropology, ethnicity, history of anthropology, art and aesthetics.

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  • Sanal Lidzhiev, Sayings 

    Terbish, Baasanjav; Churyumova, Elvira (2018-03-31)
    Sanal recounts 6 Kalmyk sayings. (1) ‘A word can be overcome with another word/ A cow can be slaughtered with an axe’. This saying teaches people about the importance of choosing words correctly. (2) ‘(If you need to talk, ...
  • Yuriy Sangadzhiev, About Altars 

    Terbish, Baasanjav; Churyumova, Elvira (2018-03-31)
    In this video Yuriy explains the altar in his yurt-museum in Elista. This is his story: Every yurt has an altar where people put candles (zul), statues of gods such as Buddha Shakyamuni, Green Tara, etc. Green Tara helps ...
  • Viktoria Mukobenova, Two Amulets 

    Terbish, Baasanjav; Churyumova, Elvira (2018-03-31)
    Viktoria relays a story about two amulets called mird. She says that in the past Kalmyk households kept mird amulets. When men left for war their family members would put a mird amulet around their neck as protection. It ...
  • Viktoria Mukobenova, Gandzhur and Dandzhur in Chilgir 

    Terbish, Baasanjav; Churyumova, Elvira (2018-03-31)
    Viktoria relays a story about Gandzhur and Dandzhur texts that were kept in a temple in Chilgir. She says that the ancestors of the people who live today in Tsatkhl used to move from one place to another. At one point in ...

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