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dc.contributor.authorJagger, Carolen
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Ruth Jen
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Fionaen
dc.contributor.authorSpiers, Nicola Aen
dc.contributor.authorNickson, Judithen
dc.contributor.authorPaykel, Eugene Sen
dc.contributor.authorHuppert, Feliciaen
dc.contributor.authorBrayne, Carolen
dc.contributor.authorMRC-CFAS,en
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-14T14:29:45Z
dc.date.available2011-06-14T14:29:45Z
dc.date.issued2007-07-13en
dc.identifier.citationBMC Public Health 2007, 7:156
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.dspace.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/237669
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Projections of health and social care need are highly sensitive to assumptions about cohort trends in health and disability. We use a repeated population-based cross-sectional study from the Cambridgeshire centre of the UK Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study to investigate trends in the health of the young-old UK population Methods Non-overlapping cohorts of men and women aged 65–69 years in 1991/2 (n = 689) and 1996/7 (n = 687) were compared on: self-reported diseases and conditions; self-rated health; mobility limitation; disability by logistic regression and four-year survival by Cox Proportional Hazards Regression models, with adjustments for differences in socio-economic and lifestyle factors. Results Survival was similar between cohorts (HR: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.62 to 1.32). There was a significant increase in the number of conditions reported between cohorts, with more participants reporting 3 or more conditions in the new cohort (14.2% vs. 10.1%). When individual conditions were considered, there was a 10% increase in the reporting of arthritis and a significant increase in the reporting of chronic airways obstruction (OR: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.78). Conclusion This study provides evidence of rising levels of ill-health, as measured by the prevalence of self-reported chronic conditions, in the newer cohorts of the young-old. Though changes in diagnosis or reporting of disease cannot, as yet, be excluded, to better understand whether our findings reflect real increases in ill-health, investment should be made into improved population-based databases, linking self-report and objective measures of health and function, and including those in long-term care.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoen
dc.titleCohort differences in disease and disability in the young-old: findings from the MRC Cognitive Function and Ageing Study (MRC-CFAS)en
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2011-06-14T14:29:45Z
dc.rights.holderJagger et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
prism.publicationDate2007en
dcterms.dateAccepted2007-07-13en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1186/1471-2458-7-156en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2007-07-13en
dc.contributor.orcidMatthews, Fiona [0000-0002-1728-2388]
dc.contributor.orcidHuppert, Felicia [0000-0003-2696-2286]
dc.contributor.orcidBrayne, Carol [0000-0001-5307-663X]
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2458
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (G9901400)


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