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dc.contributor.authorSpurgeon, Jessicaen
dc.contributor.authorWard, Geoffen
dc.contributor.authorSkylark, Williamen
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-13T17:24:45Z
dc.date.available2014-11-13T17:24:45Z
dc.date.issued2014-11en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, Vol 40(6), Nov 2014, 1551-1567. DOI: 10.1037/xlm0000028en
dc.identifier.issn0278-7393
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/246393
dc.description.abstractParticipants who are presented with a short list of words for immediate free recall (IFR) show a strong tendency to initiate their recall with the first list item and then proceed in forward serial order. We report two experiments that examined whether this tendency was underpinned by a short-term memory store, of the type that is argued by some to underpin recency effects in IFR. In Experiment 1, we presented three groups of participants with lists of between 2 and 12 words for IFR, delayed free recall (DFR), and continuous-distractor free recall (CDFR). The to-be-remembered words were simultaneously spoken and presented visually, and the distractor task involved silently solving a series of self-paced, visually-presented mathematical equations (e.g., “3+2+4=?”). The tendency to initiate recall at the start of short lists was greatest in IFR, but was also present in the two other recall conditions. This finding was replicated in Experiment 2, where the to-be-remembered items were presented visually in silence and the participants spoke aloud their answers to computer-paced mathematical equations. Our results necessitate that a short-term buffer cannot be fully responsible for the tendency to initiate recall from the beginning of a short list, but rather suggest that the tendency represents a general property of episodic memory that occurs across a range of timescales.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association
dc.titleWhy do participants initiate free recall of short lists of words with the first list item? Toward a general episodic memory explanationen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the accepted manuscript. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record. That's available from APA at http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/xlm/40/6/1551/.en
prism.endingPage1567
prism.publicationDate2014en
prism.publicationNameJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognitionen
prism.startingPage1551
prism.volume40en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1037/xlm0000028en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2014-11en
dc.contributor.orcidSkylark, William [0000-0002-3375-2669]
dc.identifier.eissn1939-1285
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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