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dc.contributor.authorBurchell, Brendanen
dc.contributor.authorSehnbruch, Kirstenen
dc.contributor.authorAgloni, Nurjken
dc.contributor.authorPiasna, Agnieszkaen
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-21T15:29:50Z
dc.date.available2014-11-21T15:29:50Z
dc.date.issued2015-03-15en
dc.identifier.citationDevelopment and Change 46: 197–224. doi: 10.1111/dech.12149en
dc.identifier.issn0012-155X
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/246439
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the impact of the International Labour Office’s (ILO) concept of Decent Work on development thinking and the associated literature. We attempt to answer the question of what makes a development initiative successful by comparing the decent work approach to the United Nation Development Program's (UNDP) human development concept (in conjunction with the human development indicator). We consider that the latter has been one of the most successful development concepts ever to have been launched, while the impact of decent work by comparison has been limited. Our hypothesis relating to the question of what makes a development initiative successful has three fundamental components: first, a solid theoretical foundation has to justify the launch of a development concept. A second vital factor is the availability of sufficient national and internationally comparable data that enables researchers and policymakers alike to apply the concept, preferably by means of a synthetic indicator. Third, the political will and institutional structure of the development institution that launches a concept is a key factor, particularly if data availability is limited as countries then have to be persuaded to generate new data.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors would like to thank the Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme, the European Union (FP7 project ‘Nopoor’), and the Conicyt/Fondap Proyect number 15130009 for partial funding provided for this paper.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley on behalf of the Institute of Social Studies
dc.subjectDecent Worken
dc.subjectHuman Developmenten
dc.subjectHuman Development Indicatorsen
dc.subjectEmploymenten
dc.subjectDevelopment Institutionsen
dc.titleHuman Development and Decent Work: Why some Concepts succeed and others fail to impact the Development Literatureen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the accepted manuscript. It's currently embargoed pending publication by Wiley. The final version is available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/dech.12149/abstracten
prism.endingPage224
prism.publicationDate2015en
prism.publicationNameDevelopment and Changeen
prism.startingPage197
prism.volume46en
dc.rioxxterms.funderEU FP7
dc.rioxxterms.projectid15130009
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/dech.12149en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-03-15en
dc.contributor.orcidBurchell, Brendan [0000-0002-8243-937X]
dc.identifier.eissn1467-7660
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2016-03-15


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