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dc.contributor.authorRonan, Lisaen
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, Paulen
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-19T10:45:05Z
dc.date.available2015-02-19T10:45:05Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-16en
dc.identifier.citationBrain Structure and Function, 2015, 220(5), 2475-2483. doi: 10.1007/s00429-014-0961-zen
dc.identifier.issn1863-2653
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/246886
dc.description.abstractCortical gyrification is not a random process. Instead, the folds that develop are synonymous with the functional organization of the cortex, and form patterns that are remarkably consistent across individuals and even some species. How this happens is not well understood. Although many developmental features and evolutionary adaptations have been proposed as the primary cause of gyrencephaly, it is not evident that gyrification is reducible in this way. In recent years, we have greatly increased our understanding of the multiple factors that influence cortical folding, from the action of genes in health and disease to evolutionary adaptations that characterize distinctions between gyrencephalic and lissencephalic cortices. Nonetheless it is unclear how these factors which influence events at a small-scale synthesize to form the consistent and biologically meaningful large-scale features of sulci and gyri. In this article, we review the empirical evidence which suggests that gyrification is the product of a generalized mechanism, namely the differential expansion of the cortex. By considering the implications of this model, we demonstrate that it is possible to link the fundamental biological components of the cortex to its large-scale pattern-specific morphology and functional organization.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by the Bernard Wolfe Health Neuroscience Fund and the Wellcome Trust.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.rightsAttribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales*
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectGyrificationen
dc.subjectMorphologyen
dc.subjectCerebral cortexen
dc.subjectTangential expansionen
dc.titleFrom genes to folds: a review of cortical gyrification theoryen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the final version of the article. It first appeared from Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00429-014-0961-zen
prism.endingPage2483
prism.publicationDate2014en
prism.publicationNameBrain Structure and Functionen
prism.startingPage2475
prism.volume220en
dc.rioxxterms.funderWellcome Trust
dc.rioxxterms.funderBernard Wolfe Health Neuroscience Fund
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-12-06en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s00429-014-0961-zen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2014-12-16en
dc.contributor.orcidRonan, Lisa [0000-0001-8580-921X]
dc.contributor.orcidFletcher, Paul [0000-0001-8257-1517]
dc.identifier.eissn1863-2661
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (093875/Z/10/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (095692/Z/11/Z)


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Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales