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dc.contributor.authorDay, Felixen
dc.contributor.authorElks, Cathyen
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Anna Men
dc.contributor.authorOng, Kennethen
dc.contributor.authorPerry, Johnen
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-05T11:26:07Z
dc.date.available2015-06-05T11:26:07Z
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationDay et al. Scientific Reports (2015) Vol. 5, Article number: 11208. doi: 10.1038/srep11208en
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/248279
dc.description.abstractEarly puberty timing is associated with higher risks for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease in women and therefore represents a potential target for early preventive interventions. We characterised the range of diseases and other adverse health outcomes associated with early or late puberty timing in men and women in the very large UK Biobank study. Recalled puberty timing and past/current diseases were self-reported by questionnaire. We limited analyses to individuals of White ethnicity (250,037 women; 197,714 men) and to disease outcomes with at least 500 cases (~0·2% prevalence) and we applied stringent correction for multiple testing (corrected threshold P<7.48×10-5). In models adjusted for socioeconomic position and adiposity/body composition variables, both in women and men separately, earlier puberty timing was associated with higher risks for angina, hypertension and T2D. Furthermore, compared to the median/average group, earlier or later puberty timing in women or men was associated with higher risks for 48 adverse outcomes, across a range of cancers, cardio-metabolic, gynaecological/obstetric, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and neuro-cognitive categories. Notably, both early and late menarche were associated with higher risks for early natural menopause in women. Puberty timing in both men and women appears to have a profound impact on later health.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research has been conducted using the UK Biobank Resource. This work was supported by the Medical Research Council [Unit Programme number MC_UU_12015/2].
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNPG
dc.titlePuberty timing associated with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and also diverse health outcomes in men and women: the UK Biobank studyen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the final version of the article. It first appeared from NPG via http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep11208en
prism.number11208en
prism.publicationDate2015en
prism.publicationNameScientific Reportsen
prism.volume5en
dc.rioxxterms.funderMRC
dc.rioxxterms.projectidMC_UU_12015/2
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-04-20en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/srep11208en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015en
dc.contributor.orcidDay, Felix [0000-0003-3789-7651]
dc.contributor.orcidOng, Kenneth [0000-0003-4689-7530]
dc.contributor.orcidPerry, John [0000-0001-6483-3771]
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_12015/2)
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (MC_U106179472)


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