Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorChristian, Julieen
dc.contributor.authorGoldstone, Aimeeen
dc.contributor.authorKuai, Shu-Guangen
dc.contributor.authorChin, Wynneen
dc.contributor.authorAbrams, Dominicen
dc.contributor.authorKourtzi, Zoeen
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-18T13:06:08Z
dc.date.available2015-06-18T13:06:08Z
dc.date.issued2015-06-10en
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Aging Neuroscience 7:105. doi: 10.3389/fnagi.2015.00105en
dc.identifier.issn1663-4365
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/248549
dc.description.abstractIt is common wisdom that practice makes perfect; but why do some adults learn better than others? Here, we investigate individuals’ cognitive and social profiles to test which variables account for variability in learning ability across the lifespan. In particular, we focused on visual learning using tasks that test the ability to inhibit distractors and select task-relevant features. We tested the ability of young and older adults to improve through training in the discrimination of visual global forms embedded in a cluttered background. Further, we used a battery of cognitive tasks and psycho-social measures to examine which of these variables predict training-induced improvement in perceptual tasks and may account for individual variability in learning ability. Using partial least squares regression modeling, we show that visual learning is influenced by cognitive (i.e., cognitive inhibition, attention) and social (strategic and deep learning) factors rather than an individual’s age alone. Further, our results show that independent of age, strong learners rely on cognitive factors such as attention, while weaker learners use more general cognitive strategies. Our findings suggest an important role for higher-cognitive circuits involving executive functions that contribute to our ability to improve in perceptual tasks after training across the lifespan.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by grants to ZK from the Leverhulme Trust [RF-2011- 378] and the [European Community’s] Seventh Framework Programme [FP7/2007-2013] under agreement PITN-GA-2011- 290011 and Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council [D52199X,E027436].
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFrontiers
dc.rightsAttribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/*
dc.subjectperceptual learningen
dc.subjectvisual perceptionen
dc.subjectpsychophysicsen
dc.subjectcognitive abilitiesen
dc.subjectsocial profilesen
dc.subjectindividual differencesen
dc.titleSocio-cognitive profiles for visual learning in young and older adultsen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the final version. It was first published by Frontiers at http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnagi.2015.00105/abstract.en
prism.number105en
prism.publicationDate2015en
prism.publicationNameFrontiers in Aging Neuroscienceen
prism.volume7en
dc.rioxxterms.funderBBSRC
dc.rioxxterms.projectidD52199X
dc.rioxxterms.projectidE027436
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-05-19en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3389/fnagi.2015.00105en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-06-10en
dc.contributor.orcidKourtzi, Zoe [0000-0001-9441-7832]
dc.identifier.eissn1663-4365
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idLeverhulme Trust (RF-2011-378)
pubs.funder-project-idEuropean Commission (290011)


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales