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dc.contributor.authorWestwater, Margaret L.
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, Paul C.
dc.contributor.authorZiauddeen, Hisham
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-20T12:45:28Z
dc.date.available2016-06-20T12:45:28Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-02
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/256387
dc.descriptionThis is the final version of the article. It first appeared from Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-016-1229-6en
dc.description.abstractPurpose As obesity rates continue to climb, the notion that overconsumption reflects an underlying ‘food addiction’ (FA) has become increasingly influential. An increasingly popular theory is that sugar acts as an addictive agent, eliciting neurobiological changes similar to those seen in drug addiction. In this paper, we review the evidence in support of sugar addiction. Methods We reviewed the literature on food and sugar addiction and considered the evidence suggesting the addictiveness of highly processed foods, particularly those with high sugar content. We then examined the addictive potential of sugar by contrasting evidence from the animal and human neuroscience literature on drug and sugar addiction. Results We find little evidence to support sugar addiction in humans, and findings from the animal literature suggest that addiction-like behaviours, such as bingeing, occur only in the context of intermittent access to sugar. These behaviours likely arise from intermittent access to sweet tasting or highly palatable foods, not the neurochemical effects of sugar. Conclusion Given the lack of evidence supporting it, we argue against a premature incorporation of sugar addiction into the scientific literature and public policy recommendations.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWellcome Trust (Senior Fellowship award)
dc.description.sponsorshipBernard Wolfe Health Neuroscience Fund
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectsugar addictionen
dc.subjectobesityen
dc.subjectbinge eatingen
dc.subjectanimal neuroscienceen
dc.subjectdrug addictionen
dc.titleSugar Addiction: The State of the Scienceen
dc.typeArticleen
prism.endingPage69
prism.issueIdentifiersupplement 2
prism.publicationNameEuropean Journal of Nutritionen
prism.startingPage55
prism.volume55
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.330
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-05-20
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s00394-016-1229-6
rioxxterms.versionVoRen


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International