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dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Ewanen
dc.contributor.authorLudden, Catherineen
dc.contributor.authorBrodrick, Hayley Jen
dc.contributor.authorBlane, Bethen
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Gráinneen
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Dearbháileen
dc.contributor.authorColl, Francescen
dc.contributor.authorReuter, Sandraen
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Nicholas Men
dc.contributor.authorHolmes, Marken
dc.contributor.authorO’Connell, Brianen
dc.contributor.authorParkhill, Julianen
dc.contributor.authorTörök, M Esteeen
dc.contributor.authorCormican, Martinen
dc.contributor.authorPeacock, Sharonen
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-28T08:48:34Z
dc.date.available2016-10-28T08:48:34Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-03en
dc.identifier.issn1756-994X
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/260937
dc.description.abstract$\textbf{Background:}$ Long-term care facilities (LTCF) are potential reservoirs for methicillin-resistant $\textit{Staphylococcus aureus}$ (MRSA), control of which may reduce MRSA transmission and infection elsewhere in the healthcare system. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) has been used successfully to understand MRSA epidemiology and transmission in hospitals and has the potential to identify transmission between these and LTCF. $\textbf{Methods:}$ Two prospective observational studies of MRSA carriage were conducted in LTCF in England and Ireland. MRSA isolates were whole-genome sequenced and analyzed using established methods. Genomic data were available for MRSA isolated in the local healthcare systems (isolates submitted by hospitals and general practitioners). $\textbf{Results:}$ We sequenced a total of 181 MRSA isolates from the two study sites. The majority of MRSA were multilocus sequence type (ST)22. WGS identified one likely transmission event between residents in the English LTCF and three putative transmission events in the Irish LTCF. WGS also identified closely related isolates present in colonized Irish residents and their immediate environment. Based on phylogenetic reconstruction, closely related MRSA clades were identified between the LTCF and their healthcare referral network, together with putative MRSA acquisition by LTCF residents during hospital admission. $\textbf{Conclusions:}$ These data confirm that MRSA is transmitted between residents of LTCF and is both acquired and transmitted to others in referral hospitals and beyond. Our data present compelling evidence for the importance of environmental contamination in MRSA transmission, reinforcing the importance of environmental cleaning. The use of WGS in this study highlights the need to consider infection control in hospitals and community healthcare facilities as a continuum.
dc.description.sponsorshipUKCRC Translational Infection Research (TIR) Initiative, Medical Research Council (Grant ID: G1000803), Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, National Institute for Health Research, Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government Health Directorate, Hospital Infection Society (Major Research Grant), Wellcome Trust (Grant ID: 098051), Academy of Medical Sciences, Health Foundation, National Institute for Health Research Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectMRSAen
dc.subjectwhole-genome sequencingen
dc.subjectmolecular epidemiologyen
dc.subjecttransmissionen
dc.subjectlong-term care facilitiesen
dc.subjectnursing homeen
dc.subject$\textit{Staphylococcus aureus}$en
dc.titleTransmission of methicillin-resistant $\textit{Staphylococcus aureus}$ in long-term care facilities and their related healthcare networksen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the final version of the article. It first appeared from BioMed Central via http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13073-016-0353-5en
prism.number102en
prism.publicationDate2016en
prism.publicationNameGenome Medicineen
prism.volume8en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.6111
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-09-13en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1186/s13073-016-0353-5en
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-10-03en
dc.contributor.orcidHarrison, Ewan [0000-0003-2720-0507]
dc.contributor.orcidLudden, Catherine [0000-0001-9503-0744]
dc.contributor.orcidHolmes, Mark [0000-0002-5454-1625]
dc.contributor.orcidParkhill, Julian [0000-0002-7069-5958]
dc.contributor.orcidPeacock, Sharon [0000-0002-1718-2782]
dc.identifier.eissn1756-994X
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (G1000803)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (G1001787)
pubs.funder-project-idAcademy of Medical Sciences (unknown)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MR/N029399/1)
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 12:57:23 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International