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dc.contributor.authorHoward-Grenville, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Aen
dc.contributor.authorEarle, Aen
dc.contributor.authorHaack, Jen
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Den
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-13T12:55:01Z
dc.date.available2016-12-13T12:55:01Z
dc.date.issued2017-09en
dc.identifier.issn0001-8392
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/261542
dc.description.abstractOccupational membership guides what people do, how they think of themselves, and how they interact in organizations and with society. While a rich literature explains how occupations adapt in response to external triggers for change, we have limited insight into how occupational incumbents, absent external triggers, work to influence how their peers do their work. We investigate the emergence and growth of “green chemistry,” an effort by chemists to encourage other chemists to reduce the health, safety, and environmental impacts of chemical products and processes. We find that advocates simultaneously advanced normalizing, moralizing, and pragmatizing frames for green chemistry and that each frame resonated differently with chemists in their various occupational roles. While this pluralistic approach generated broad acceptance of the change effort, it also exposed tensions, which threatened the coherence of the change. Divergent responses of advocates to these tensions contribute to a persistent state of pluralism and dynamism in the change effort. We discuss implications for theory on occupational change arising from our attention to internally-generated peer-driven change, heterogeneity within occupations, and change efforts that moralize occupational work.
dc.description.sponsorshipMeyer Fund for Sustainability grant (University of Oregon)
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGE Publications
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en
dc.subjectoccupationsen
dc.subjectoccupational changeen
dc.subjectoccupational identityen
dc.subjectprofessionsen
dc.subjectchange processesen
dc.subjectmultivocalityen
dc.subjectpluralismen
dc.subjectgreen chemistryen
dc.subjectsustainabilityen
dc.subjectgrand challengesen
dc.title"If chemists don’t do it, who is going to?" Peer-driven occupational change and the emergence of green chemistryen
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage560
prism.issueIdentifier3en
prism.publicationDate2017en
prism.publicationNameAdministrative Science Quarterlyen
prism.startingPage524
prism.volume62en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.6741
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-10-04en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1177/0001839217690530en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-09en
dc.contributor.orcidHoward-Grenville, Jennifer [0000-0002-3737-0465]
dc.identifier.eissn1930-3815
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.issuedOnline2017-01-19en


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International