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dc.contributor.authorKhandaker, Golamen
dc.contributor.authorDantzer, Ren
dc.contributor.authorJones, Peteren
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-19T11:03:27Z
dc.date.available2017-05-19T11:03:27Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-18en
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/264316
dc.description.abstractAccumulating evidence indicate a role for the immune system particularly inflammation and autoimmunity in the aetiology of major psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia. In this paper, we discuss some of the key advances in immunopsychiatry in order to highlight to psychiatrists and other health professionals how an increased understanding of this field might enhance our knowledge of illness mechanism and approaches to treatment. We present a brief overview of clinical research that link inflammation and autoimmunity with depression and psychosis, including potential role of inflammation in treatment response, current evidence for the effectiveness of immune-modulating treatment for depression and psychosis, and possible role of inflammation in common physical comorbidities for these disorders such as coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus. Gaining a better understanding of the role of immune system could be paradigm changing for psychiatry. We need collaborations between clinicians and scientists to deliver high-quality translational research in order to fully realise the clinical potential of this exciting and rapidly expanding field.
dc.description.sponsorshipGMK is supported by an Intermediate Clinical Fellowship from the Wellcome Trust (201486/Z/16/Z) and a Clinical Lecturer Starter Grant from the Academy of Medical Sciences, UK (grant no. 80354). PBJ acknowledges grant support from the Wellcome Trust (095844/Z/11/Z & 088869/Z/09/Z) and NIHR (RP-PG-0606–1335, Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre and CLAHRC East of England). RD has received grants from the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke of the National Institutes of Health (grants R01 NS073939; R01 NS074999), the National Cancer Institute (R01CA193522) and the National Institute of Mental Health (R21MH104694).
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectautoimmunityen
dc.subjectautoantibodyen
dc.subjectcytokineen
dc.subjectdepressionen
dc.subjectimmune systemen
dc.subjectimmunopsychiatryen
dc.subjectinflammationen
dc.subjectmental disordersen
dc.subjectpsychiatryen
dc.subjectschizophreniaen
dc.titleImmunopsychiatry: important factsen
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationDate2017en
prism.publicationNamePsychological Medicineen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.9568
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-03-01en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1017/S0033291717000745en
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-04-18en
dc.contributor.orcidKhandaker, Golam [0000-0002-4935-9220]
dc.contributor.orcidJones, Peter [0000-0002-0387-880X]
dc.identifier.eissn1469-8978
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (201486/Z/16/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idAcademy of Medical Sciences (unknown)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (088869/Z/09/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (095844/Z/11/Z)
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 12:53:45 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International